CSM makes first appearance in state title game

The College of San Mateo will be hoping for a bit of “beginners luck” in its first state championship appearance in school history, against Southern California football powerhouse Mt. San Antonio College on Saturday.

CSM (10-1) will host Mt. SAC (12-1), which will be making its third consecutive trip to the title game. The Mounties lost both prior title matches to the City College of San Francisco and Butte College, respectively.

 “We’re hoping the third time will be the charm,” Mt. SAC coach Robert Jastrab said.

CSM advanced to the title game by defeating Reedley College in the Bulldog Bowl on Nov. 21, while</p>

Mt. SAC has played two extra games in the eight-team Southern California playoffs.

Both coaches acknowledged that there could be advantages to each playoff situation, but denied any potential effect once the game begins.

“It is what it is,” CSM coach Bret Pollack said. “It’s a break and that’s what it is. We’re gonna take that break and use it to our advantage and take as many positives we can get out of it.”

Jastrab echoed Pollack’s sentiment.

“It’s a tough road,” Jastrab said. “It could be an advantage or a disadvantage. They can get healthy and strong, while we’re still icing our wounds. It is what it is. None of that really matters. We’re both playing for a state championship. Let the best team win.”

Mt. SAC outscored opponents by an average of 28.3 points in its three playoff games, capped by their 27-2 victory over Palomar College in the Southern California final on Saturday.

“They are athletic at every position,” Pollack said of the Mounties. “They’re well coached and have no assignment errors. That is the recipe for success.”

Mt. SAC is the top ranked team in the state, while CSM was ranked second in the final poll.

“By far, they’re the best team we’ve played all year,” Jastrob said.

Ultimately, the key to the game may be the Bulldogs’ triple-option running game, which averages a state-high 293.5 rushing yards per game.

“We run the option because no one else does,” Pollack said. “We see that as an advantage, because teams don’t see it every week and have to practice for it.”

Mt. SAC was ranked fourth in the state at stopping the run in the regular season, allowing only 71.7 rushing yards per game, and only allowed an average of 77.7 rushing yards in their three playoff games.

“We don’t see a lot of the option football they run,” Jastrob said. “It gives us problems. They have a lot of weapons and its given us lots of difficulties.”

CSMfootballOther Sportssports

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

California is set to receive supplies of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, which is still under review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. (Courtesy photo)
California could receive 380K doses of new J&J COVID vaccine next week

California could receive 380,300 doses of the new Johnson & Johnson vaccine… Continue reading

Disability advocates protested outside the home of San Francisco Health Officer Tomas Aragon. (Courtesy Brooke Anderson)
Vaccine rollout plan for people with disabilities remains deeply flawed

On February 13, disability activists paid a visit to the house of… Continue reading

A Bay Area Concrete Recycling facility that opened on PG&E property in 2019. Former PG&E employees have been accused of accepting bribes from Bay Area Concrete. (Courtesy of Bay Area Concrete Recycling via ProPublica)
Lawsuit reveals new allegations against PG&E contractor accused of fraud

By Scott Morris Bay City News Foundation Utility giant Pacific Gas &… Continue reading

New protected bicycle lanes stretch from the city's Portola District to Bernal Heights. (Courtesy Bay City News)
City leaders celebrate protected bike lanes in city’s Portola, Bernal Heights neighborhoods

San Francisco city leaders on Thursday announced the completion of new protected… Continue reading

A short walk leads to the base of Yosemite Falls, requiring no snow gear except in heavy winter conditions. (Matt Johanson/Special to S.F. Examiner)
Snowy destinations abound in Yosemite winter

Those who journey to the mountains discover grand scenery, solitude .

Most Read