San Francisco Giants catcher Buster Posey (28) connects with a pitch against the Oakland Athletics at AT&T Park in San Francisco, California, on August 3, 2017. (Stan Olszewski/Special to S.F. Examiner)

Buster Posey surgery successful, Samardzija to get second opinion

AT&T PARK — Buster Posey’s season-long nightmare may be over, but arguably the toughest six-to-eight months of the San Francisco Giants’ catcher’s career are just beginning.

Posey, 31, underwent successful surgery on his right hip Monday to repair what doctors called “impingement.” The procedure, which removed bone spurs and repaired a tear in his labrum, was performed by Dr. Marc Philippon at The Steadman Clinic in Vail, Colorado.

The Giants are slated to open next season in San Diego on March 28, which will be approximately seven months from his surgery. Posey rehabilitated quickly from leg injuries suffered in a home plate collision in 2011, winning the National League MVP a year later during the first of his six All-Star seasons. If he can get back into playing shape in six months, he’ll be ready shortly after pitchers and catchers report for spring training.

The injury has bothered Posey the entire season, held him out of the All-Star game and has sapped Posey’s power to the point where he’s posted his lowest home run total, lowest slugging percentage, lowest on-base percentage and the lowest batting average of his career.

“They’re really pleased with how it went,” manager Bruce Bochy said on Monday night, after the Giants’ 2-0 win. “He’s glad to get this over with, and we’re glad it went well. He’ll be back [in San Francisco] I think Thursday, and he’ll be around.”

On Tuesday, Bochy had spoken via text with Posey and head trainer Dave Groeschner, who was in Vail to monitor Posey’s surgery.

“He’s great,” Bochy said. “He’s coming along just fine … I don’t know what all he’s doing, but they get you moving right away.”

Bochy also said that starter Jeff Samardzija — who has been sidelined with shoulder tightness since a July 14 start — will get a second opinion on Wednesday at Stanford.

Samardzija, on a rehab assignment from a shoulder ailment, experienced shoulder soreness during his first start for Double-A Richmond on Aug. 22, where he allowed just one hit in four innings on Aug. 22. He was told to rest the shoulder by a doctor. Samardzija began the season on the disabled list with a pectoral strain, and has spent 105 days this season on the DL due to that, and various shoulder ailments.

He now has an appointment with orthopedic surgeon Dr. Tim McAdams, who specializes in shoulder and elbow arthroscopy.Buster PoseyJeff SamardzijaMLBSan Francisco Giants

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