Josh Reddick is mobbed by his teammates after connecting for an infield single that plated the winning run in the bottom of the 10th inning. (Ben Margot/AP)

Josh Reddick is mobbed by his teammates after connecting for an infield single that plated the winning run in the bottom of the 10th inning. (Ben Margot/AP)

A’s overcome Astros in extra innings with walkoff infield single

OAKLAND — Josh Reddick’s walk-off single never even made it out of the infield.

With the Houston Astros playing a shift, Oakland Athletics third base coach Ron Washington sent Marcus Semien home all the way from second, as shortstop Carlos Correa ranged far to his right to track down the grounder.

“It’s like one of those basketball shots, where [you’re like,] ‘No, no, no, yeah!’” manager Bob Melvin said of Washington’s daring call that gave his club a 4-3 win in 10 innings. “It takes experience from a third base coach and aggressiveness.”

The A’s almost won the contest in the ninth when Coco Crisp tied the game with a double off the wall in right. The only problem was that Crisp thought his shot had cleared the barrier. He was easily tagged out by Correa, as he coasted around the bases. 

“He thought it went out of the park,” Melvin explained.

With a blister shelving the club’s most sought-after trade piece, the A’s turned to their bearded rookie to start on Tuesday night. Stepping in for Rich Hill, Dillon Overton delivered the most-effective outing of his three big league starts.

“I thought he was great,” Melvin said after the left-hander held the Houston Astros to three runs in 6.1 innings while striking out six. “And we needed him to go deep in the game. I’m not sure he knew that. Against a lineup like that? That was really good.”

Melvin admitted that it will be a few days before the team knows when Hill will be able to play catch — much less start. With less than two weeks left before the trade deadline, Melvin hopes that the lefty will be able to avoid a trip to the disabled list.

“We’re trying not to [put him on the DL],” Melvin said. “Hopefully it doesn’t take that long, but again, we’re not really sure.”

Dillon OvertonHouston AstrosJosh Reddickkarl buscheckMLBOakland A'sOakland AthleticsRich Hill

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