Rendering of Howard Terminal (Courtesy photo)

Rendering of Howard Terminal (Courtesy photo)

A’s ballpark would bring in $7.3 billion in economic benefit

Bay Area Council Economic Institute says new waterfront stadium would generate $7.3b over 10 years

The Oakland Athletics’ plan to build a privately-financed ballpark at Howard Terminal near Jack London Square could generate $7.3 billion in economic benefits over 10 years for Oakland and Alameda County, according to a study by the Bay Area Council Economic Institute.

The Institute’s study also projected that the waterfront stadium would produce more than 6,100 new permanent jobs.

“The Oakland A’s plan represents a transformational investment for the city,” Institute director Jeff Bellisario said in a statement. “The economic benefits of a project this size will ripple throughout the Oakland community for many years.”

The analysis comes on the heels of a similar study done by the Institute in January about the economic benefits of the A’s proposed gondola system, bringing fans from downtown Oakland to the waterfront. That project, the BACEI said, would have a $685 million economic impact over 10 years. READ THE FULL ANALYSIS.

The latest analysis on the ballpark itself tallies the economic and jobs benefits from the ballpark and proposed development that would surround the stadium. That development includes 3.3 million square feet of housing, 1.5 million square feet of commercial and office space, a hotel, a performance center and other retail, cultural and civic uses.

The $7.3 billion in economic benefits translates to $902 million a year, with the ballpark itself generating $3 billion of the overall economic benefits, thanks to increased spending in the area on parking, transportation and patronizing local businesses.

One-time jobs and economic impacts due to construction were not included in the analysis.

MLB

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Private vehicles were banned from much of Market Street in January 2020, causing bike ridership on the street to increase by 25 percent and transit efficiency by as much as 12 percent. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
SFMTA board approves new Better Market Street legislation

Advocates say traffic safety improvements don’t go far enough to make up for lost bikeway

San Francisco City Hall is lit in gold and amber to remember victims as part of a national Memorial to Lives Lost to COVID-19 on Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
San Francisco joins national COVID memorial ceremony

San Francisco took part Tuesday in the first national Memorial to Lives… Continue reading

The S.F. Police Department has canceled discretionary days off and will have extra officers on duty for Inauguration Day, chief Bill Scott said Tuesday. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>
SF ‘prepared for anything’ ahead of inauguration, but no protests expected

Authorities boosting police staffing, security at City Hall

Dr. Grant Colfax, director of the San Francisco Department of Public Health, said Tuesday that The City received only a fraction of the COVID vaccine doses it requested this week. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>
Unpredictable supplies leave SF running low on COVID vaccine

Reported reactions to Moderna shots prompt hold on 8,000 doses

The T Third Street train resumes service on Saturday, joined by a new express route between Bayview-Hunters Point and downtown.<ins> (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>
Bayview-Hunters Point residents get first direct express bus to downtown

New Muni route to launch alongside the return of the T-Third train

Most Read