SF Zoo hosts conference on how to care for aging animals

Zoo animals are living increasingly longer lives, posing new challenges for animal professionals.

To that end, animal professionals met at the San Francisco Zoo this week to address related challenges that come with caring for older animals.

The topics of the conference ranged from health concerns to public perception of aging animals and exhibit modifications, all based around animals continuing to live increasingly longer lives.

“Our animal care philosophy emphasizes that we ensure the behavioral and physical wellness of all animals at all stages of life,” Jason Watters, vice president of Wellness and Animal Behavior at the San Francisco Zoo, said in a statement.

In a recent paper published in the World Association of Zoos and Aquariums Journal, Watters and his colleagues highlighted the San Francisco Zoo’s unique approach to aging animal care.

The conference was held on Tuesday and Wednesday, and focused primarily on how to ensure positive welfare for all ages of animals.

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