(Photo via HandUp)

(Photo via HandUp)

HandUp gift card program for the homeless expands across SF

A unique way to help San Francisco’s homeless population got an extra boost Monday, as Mayor Ed Lee and Jeff Kositsky, Director of the Department of Homelessness and Supportive Housing, announced the expansion of the HandUp gift cards program.

HandUp gift cards each contain $25, and can be redeemed at several locations throughout the City for goods or services. The founding concept is that by handing these gift cards out to people experiencing homelessness in San Francisco, one can help them access food, health services, or assistance that could contribute to getting them back on their feet.

“The HandUp gift cards are a great way to give and connect people to services and resources they need most,” said Mayor Lee. “With the holidays fast approaching, the Hand Up gift card expansion couldn’t have come at a better time.”

Sammie Rayner, co-founder and COO of HandUp, describes a recent experience a gift card recipient had. “I  gave a HandUp Gift Card to a young man who wanted money for work boots so he could get a construction job,” she said. “After bringing his gift card to Project Homeless Connect, he was able to not only put the money toward his work boots, but also learn about other valuable resources the city has to offer.”

In San Francisco HandUp cards can be redeemed at GLIDE, Project Homeless Connect, Mission Neighborhood Resource Center, MSC South Shelter in SoMa and Mother Brown’s in the Bayview.

Those interested in purchasing HandUp cards to give out to the community can now find them in person at The Hall SF at 1028 Market St, Equator Coffee and Teas at 989 Market St, and Equator Coffee and Teas 222 Second St. They’re also available for purchase online.handuphomelessnessJeff Kositsky

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