A look back at the chaos, coverage of Loma Prieta earthquake

A collapsed building and burned area at Beach and Divisadero streets in the Marina District following the Oct. 17, 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. (Courtesy U.S. Geological Survey)
The front page of the Oct. 18, 1989 edition of the San Francisco Examiner, which included a lot of misinformation that was later corrected.
The entrance and garage of an apartment building on Beach Street in the Marina District that was damaged by the Oct. 17, 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. (Courtesy U.S. Geological Survey)
A story about the huge fire and building collapses in the Marina District that appeared in the Oct. 18, 1989 edition of the San Francisco Examiner.
The smoldering remains of an apartment complex at Beach and Divisadero streets in the Marina District that was destroyed by the Oct. 17, 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. (Courtesy U.S. Geological Survey)
Fallen bricks and debris outside an apartment building at Beach and Divisadero streets in the Marina District that was damaged in the Oct. 17, 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. (Courtesy U.S. Geological Survey)
An aerial view of collapsed and burned buildings near Beach and Divisadero streets in the Marina District damaged by the Oct. 17, 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. (Courtesy U.S. Geological Survey)
A car lies crushed under the third story of an apartment building in the Marina District that was damaged by the Oct. 17, 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. (Courtesy U.S. Geological Survey)
A story about a brick facade that collapsed from a building at Fifth and Townsend streets in the South of Market neighborhood that appeared in the Oct. 18, 1989 edition of the San Francisco Examiner. Five people were later confirmed killed in the collapse.
Cars sit under rubble from a collapsed brick facade of a building near Fifth and Townsend streets damaged by the Oct. 17, 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. Five people were killed in the collapse. (Courtesy U.S. Geological Survey)
Stories of the events that unfolded when a piece of the upper deck of the eastern span of the Bay Bridge collapsed onto the lower deck that appeared in the Oct. 18, 1989 edition of the San Francisco Examiner.
An aerial view of a collapsed roadbed on the cantilever eastern span of the Bay Bridge that was damaged by the Oct. 17, 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. (Courtesy U.S. Geological Survey)
An aerial view of a collapsed roadbed on the cantilever eastern span of the Bay Bridge that was damaged by the Oct. 17, 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. (Courtesy U.S. Geological Survey) An aerial view of a collapsed roadbed on the cantilever eastern span of the Bay Bridge that was damaged by the Oct. 17, 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. (Courtesy U.S. Geological Survey)
A story on the collapse of the Cypress Street viaduct of Interstate 880 in Oakland that appeared in the Oct. 18, 1989 edition of the San Francisco Examiner.
An aerial view of the collapsed Cypress Street viaduct section of Interstate 880 in Oakland that was destroyed in the Oct. 17, 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, killing 42 people. (Courtesy U.S. Geological Survey)
A view of the collapsed upper deck of the Cypress Street viaduct section of Interstate 880 in Oakland that was destroyed in the Oct. 17, 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, killing 42 people. (Courtesy U.S. Geological Survey)
The Examiner was there as thousands of fans were waiting at Candlestick Park for game 3 of the World Series between the San Francisco Giants and Oakland Athletics to begin when the quake hit. The series resumed 10 days later.

Thirty years after the ground shook for 15 seconds, take a look back at some of the damage that the 6.9-magnitude Loma Prieta earthquake caused and how the Examiner staff covered it as things unfolded back on Oct. 17, 1989.

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