Words to the wise: Listen to the words, not the interpretation

Boy, some people fly off the handle at nothing these days. “F— the president,” an unidentified Democrat said at a House caucus, concerning the tax deal President Barack Obama cut with Republicans.

At once, the keen ears of Maureen Dowd picked up a message: “Fair or not, what I heard was an unspoken word in the air: ‘F— you, boy!’” There was no doubt in her mind that this was the message.

“Some people just can’t believe a black man is president, and will never accept it,” Dowd said.

Joe Klein said people were “freaked” by the feeling that the country they loved was being taken over by “furriners … Latinos, South Asians, East Asians … liberated, uppity blacks.”

Did they say this? Not really.

They said it before, about Rep. Joe Wilson, R-S.C., who muttered “you lie” during a speech by Obama.

It was fun while it lasted, but now it is becoming more and more obvious that the attempt of the left to describe opposition as rooted in bias was a self-serving fraud all along.

Wilson was impolite, but “lie” is a race-neutral comment. “Kill the bill” isn’t a race-conscious protest. And the people Klein called “tea baggers” were so “freaked” by the loss of their country to Hispanics, East Asians and blacks that they elected Hispanics in New Mexico, Nevada and Florida; an East Asian female in South Carolina; and two blacks so “uppity” that one beat the son of Strom Thurmond in South Carolina. By Klein’s standards,
“furriners” all.

America has faults, and everyone knows it, but it frequently shakes them with speed. In 1960, Roman Catholic John F. Kennedy ran for president amid charges that the pope was about to take over the country. Eight years later, his brother and Eugene McCarthy (an ex-seminarian) both ran for president and nobody cared.

Likewise, it took us less than two years into the term of our first non-white president for his fellow pols to show him the same respect, awe and deference they had shown to Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush.

In politics, tribal passions organize themselves around parties, not race, and express themselves crudely. Clinton wasn’t racist when he tried to nudge Rep. Kendrick Meek, D-Fla., out of the race for the Senate in Florida.

The good news is that most politicians are easy enough around people of varying skin tones that they feel free to treat them the same way they treat those of their own ethnic provenance.
Is this progress? You betcha. Is it time to get rid of those race-colored glasses? Oh boy, it sure is.

Examiner columnist Noemie Emery is a contributing editor to The Weekly Standard and author of “Great Expectations: The Troubled Lives of Political Families.”

Op Edsop-edOpinionSan Francisco

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Superintendent Vincent Matthews said some students and families who want to return will not be able to do so at this time. “We truly wish we could reopen schools for everyone,” he said. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
SFUSD sets April reopening date after reaching tentative agreement with teachers union

San Francisco Unified School District has set April 12 as its reopening… Continue reading

Gov. Gavin Newsom has signed legislation intended to help California schools reopen. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Newsom signs $6.6 billion school reopening legislative package

By Eli Walsh Bay City News Foundation Gov. Gavin Newsom and state… Continue reading

Recology executives have acknowledged overcharging city ratepayers. (Mira Laing/2017 Special to S.F. Examiner)
Recology to repay customers $95M in overcharged garbage fees, city attorney says

San Francisco’s waste management company, Recology, has agreed to repay its customers… Continue reading

A construction worker watches a load for a crane operator at the site of the future Chinatown Muni station for the Central Subway on Tuesday, March 3, 2021. (Sebastian Miño-Bucheli / Special to the S.F. Examiner)
Major construction on Central Subway to end by March 31

SFMTA board approves renegotiated contract with new deadline, more contractor payments

Most Read