The City has poor record on racism

“Resolution wanes following criticism from police union,” The City, Dec. 17

The City has poor record on racism

The resolution by Supervisor John Avalos that condemns “broken and racially biased police and justice system” is disingenuous at the very least. And I suspect it is only the latest hollow attempt to ingratiate City Hall to San Francisco's black community in typical word-only fashion.

It is also hypocritical to scold police departments across this nation for what many rightfully view as racist against blacks. City Hall is no better toward its struggling black community.

How can Avalos chastise anyone for racism? Avalos was one of the unanimous votes that approved a settlement to a black man and former Human Rights Commission staffer for sex and race discrimination against his boss. Commission Executive Director Theresa Sparks, whose conduct forced the suit, continues to receive support from the Board of Supervisors and Mayor Ed Lee, who reappointed her.

Before Avolos starts on another holier-than-thou campaign, the supervisors and mayor should publicly restate for the record their support of a white city employee who has shown racist tendencies.

Allen Jones

San Francisco</p>

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