Stuart confuses how to access shelter bed

“Give people homes to fix homelessness,”
Broke-Ass City, Oct. 1
Stuart confuses how to access shelter bed

After reading Broke-Ass Stuart’s column, San Franciscans may be confused about how to access a shelter bed. Calling 311 allows people to make a 90-day shelter reservation. This change has been in effect for more than a year-and-a-half and has been a huge success and greatly appreciated by those seeking shelter.

I assume the Examiner has good intentions, but the facts and quotes in this column are misleading to say the least.

Sam Dodge
Director of Public Policy,
Mayor’s Office of H.O.P.E.

”Seeking a cure for premature capitulation,”
The City, Oct. 4
Green got it right

Yes, and amen, brother!

Thank you Mr. Green for naming the “affliction [that] plagues the Bay Area.” I have grown so tired of these PCs. Premature capitulations regularly given to these large corporations are completely justified, if you live in an undesirable area of America where workers/people/businesses need enticement to locate there. But as most of us living in the Bay Area know, we (and a lot of other Americans, if they could afford it) would rather live here than just about anywhere else in this great country.

It is common knowledge that these corporations have poured big bucks into certain politicians’ campaigns/pockets. Anyone who is slightly aware of what is going on here knows this. What I don’t understand is the apathy of many of our registered voters and unregistered renters.

Please, please do not let the corporate machines destroy our hard-earned, wonderful, richly diverse heritage that makes this place our favorite spot in the universe. I am not anti-growth. I know the world grows and I want people want to come to this area because of our reputation of acceptance and diversity. I do not resent new arrivals.

But to expand on Green’s thoughts, if Airbnb, Google, Twitter, etc. had been told to pay their share from the start not only would there have been no need for so much money to be spent to decide these issues in this election, but San Francisco could have already started building the middle- and low-income housing it so badly needs.

We have all read about the evictions. While you may not have been personally affected by this problem (yet), there is a good chance you know someone who has.

If a company without more than several million dollars in actual assets can be valued at $50 billion dollars, and I said if, it can cough up their fair share of taxes also.

My thanks to Mr. Green for writing so succinctly and clearly about this malady and to the Examiner for having a brass pair the Chronicle so obviously doesn’t.

Larry Doss
San Francisco

Just Posted

It’s not uncommon to find a plastic tampon applicator washed up on the beach. (Courtesy Eva Holman)
The environmental toll of disposable feminine products

Uninhibited feedback by cisgender women is key

Dreamforce returned to San Francisco in person this week – but with a tiny sliver of past attendance. PHOTO COURTESY SALESFORCE
Dreamforce returns with hundreds on hand, down from 170,000 in the past

High hopes for a larger Salesforce conference shriveled during the summer

The numbers show nearly 14 percent of San Francisco voters who participated in the Sept. 14 recall election wanted to oust Gov. Gavin Newsom from elected office. (Shutterstock photo)
(Shutterstock photo)
How San Francisco neighborhoods voted in the Newsom recall

Sunset tops the list as the area with the most ‘yes’ votes

Alison Collins says that she and other members of San Francisco Unified School District Board of Education facing potential recall “represent constituents that are often erased or talked over.” <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
Alison Collins speaks: Embattled SF school board member confronts the recall effort

‘It’s important for folks to know what this recall is about. It’s bigger than any one of us.’

Is the Black Cat incident a distraction from the recovery of The City’s storied nightlife industry or does Mayor London Breed’s behavior inadvertently highlight the predicament the industry’s been in since San Francisco reinstated indoor mask requirements on Aug. 20?<ins> (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner, 2021)</ins>
Club owners to maskless mayor: Are we the new fun police?

Black Cat affair highlights difficult recovery for nightlife industry

Most Read