Stuart confuses how to access shelter bed

“Give people homes to fix homelessness,”
Broke-Ass City, Oct. 1
Stuart confuses how to access shelter bed

After reading Broke-Ass Stuart’s column, San Franciscans may be confused about how to access a shelter bed. Calling 311 allows people to make a 90-day shelter reservation. This change has been in effect for more than a year-and-a-half and has been a huge success and greatly appreciated by those seeking shelter.

I assume the Examiner has good intentions, but the facts and quotes in this column are misleading to say the least.

Sam Dodge
Director of Public Policy,
Mayor’s Office of H.O.P.E.

”Seeking a cure for premature capitulation,”
The City, Oct. 4
Green got it right

Yes, and amen, brother!

Thank you Mr. Green for naming the “affliction [that] plagues the Bay Area.” I have grown so tired of these PCs. Premature capitulations regularly given to these large corporations are completely justified, if you live in an undesirable area of America where workers/people/businesses need enticement to locate there. But as most of us living in the Bay Area know, we (and a lot of other Americans, if they could afford it) would rather live here than just about anywhere else in this great country.

It is common knowledge that these corporations have poured big bucks into certain politicians’ campaigns/pockets. Anyone who is slightly aware of what is going on here knows this. What I don’t understand is the apathy of many of our registered voters and unregistered renters.

Please, please do not let the corporate machines destroy our hard-earned, wonderful, richly diverse heritage that makes this place our favorite spot in the universe. I am not anti-growth. I know the world grows and I want people want to come to this area because of our reputation of acceptance and diversity. I do not resent new arrivals.

But to expand on Green’s thoughts, if Airbnb, Google, Twitter, etc. had been told to pay their share from the start not only would there have been no need for so much money to be spent to decide these issues in this election, but San Francisco could have already started building the middle- and low-income housing it so badly needs.

We have all read about the evictions. While you may not have been personally affected by this problem (yet), there is a good chance you know someone who has.

If a company without more than several million dollars in actual assets can be valued at $50 billion dollars, and I said if, it can cough up their fair share of taxes also.

My thanks to Mr. Green for writing so succinctly and clearly about this malady and to the Examiner for having a brass pair the Chronicle so obviously doesn’t.

Larry Doss
San Francisco

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