SmartMeters will create PG&E demand pricing

As I read “PG&E customers seeing double,” regarding the gas projects that ratepayers are being asked to fund twice, the gas SmartMeters are not listed, and they were added at a time when the natural-gas-powered vehicles were called our pollution savior.

Since there was no infrastructure of natural-gas pumps to supply these vehicles with fuel, they did not become popular, and now the electric battery-powered vehicle is of concern to PG&E since the infrastructure is available to power then in each of our homes and businesses, but the drain on the grid for each of them is equal to the entire load of a modern home. And now we have been asked to pay twice for the electric SmartMeter.

PG&E sees that workers will charge up their electric vehicles when they are at work and not just at night when they are home, which will further overload the electric grid during the day. Thus the need for demand pricing to even out electrical time of use, which is the reason for the SmartMeters. Thus, as consumers are finding out, it is vastly more expensive.

Frank Norton
San Francisco

Ruining chance at rail line

I would love to thank the residents of the San Francisco Peninsula for being such NIMBYs and derailing the California high-speed rail project. If these Luddites could only travel to France and to Japan and see how it is done there, perhaps they could get their collective heads out of the sand. As a result of their actions, we will now get a railroad to nowhere.

Since World War II, this country has moved away from rail travel while Europe and Japan have not. As a result, much of the infrastructure on which to build and expand is no longer there. Little by little, the old Southern Pacific right of way to San Jose has grown narrower and narrower while the towns along the way have expanded and grown and have done nothing to protect the rail rights of way.

Irving Q. Waldorf
San Francisco

Slowing down air travel

I recently had occasion to pass through a body scanner at the Dallas airport.
Jokingly, I asked, “Is this thing going to light me up?” A good-humored TSA guy explained that flying to Europe will expose me to more radiation. I’m sure that response isn’t in the training book.

The scanner saw my hip-pocket wallet. The hand wand responded to the wad of Euros I was carrying. Instead of the normal quick pass through the metal detector, add an extra half-minute to the search. Multiply that delay times half of the 524 passengers boarding a 747, and airline travel just got more frustrating.

Paul Burton
San Francisco

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