Senate Democrats bury heads while public rejects their ideas

Most folks in the nation’s capital have probably never even heard of Jenny Beth Martin, despite the fact that the Tea Party Patriots organizer is not so quietly helping to reshape America’s future — even as the Washington Establishment obliviously goes about business as usual.

I’ve never met Martin in person, but it doesn’t take much reading of her stuff to see that she gets the two most important facts about political reality in the Obama era.

First, President Barack Obama and the Democratic Congress are fueling a growing public frustration and anger with the explosion of authoritarian, bureaucratic, unaccountable centralized government. Pollster Scott Rasmussen’s latest telephone poll found that 71 percent of those surveyed are at least somewhat angry at the current policies being pursued in Washington, with fully 46 percent “very angry.”

The 71 percent figure is up five points since September, but get this: The 46 percent is up 10 points. And it doesn’t take a political genius to see why this public anger is so widespread and intensifying. More than half of those surveyed by Rasmussen, 52 percent, say neither the Democrats nor the Republicans understand what the nation needs.

Among Republicans, 65 percent say that, while 59 percent of independents hold the same view. These numbers are down a bit from September, but they will surge back up — possibly way up — if the Senate approves its version of health care reform around Christmas.

The public’s anger is reflected in other ways. Only 9 percent of those surveyed by Rasmussen trust the judgment of Washington, D.C., politicians, compared to 74 percent who trust the judgment of the people.

Three-fourths of the public looks at the nation’s capital and sees special interests feasting with their friends in government at the public till, according to Rasmussen. Nearly as many, 68 percent, believe Big Government and Big Business work together against the public interest.

And being a member of Congress is the least respected job one can hold, according to Rasmussen’s surveys. The most respected jobs? Being a small-business owner who creates jobs and opportunities for people willing to work, and pastors and other religious leaders who answer to a higher authority than bureaucrats.

Second, as Martin clearly understands, people are increasingly angry because they are being ignored by politicians. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid is hell-bent to jam Obamacare through the Senate by Christmas, despite the fact that public opposition has been steadily growing for months.

A million or more people rallied in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 12 to show their opposition to growing government. But Democratic congressional leaders stick their heads in the ground, refusing to heed the public outcry.

That is why they will never see what’s coming until it is too late — for them.

Mark Tapscott is editorial page editor of The Washington Examiner and proprietor of Tapscott’s Copy Desk blog on www.washingtonexaminer.com.

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