Rec and Park would waste Prop. B funds

The Recreation and Park Department’s misleading TV ads for Proposition B conveniently leave out hidden rent increases for city tenants. Prop. B specifies that landlords can pass Prop. B  tax increases on to unsuspecting tenants. That’s just one reason why the San Francisco Tenants Union opposes Prop. B, along with many other community groups who have firsthand experience with the current regime at Rec and Park.

Our well-endowed Rec and Park department has $73.7 million in unspent money from previous bond measures. It has one of the largest park budgets of any U.S. city.

Using its political power base at City Hall, Rec and Park continually obfuscate its budgets, refuse independent review, hire six-figure advertising and PR people instead of gardeners or recreation directors, embroil us in lawsuits and mismanage our money … all the while thwarting free speech and true community input.

And now it wants us to reward them with $195 million more?

Prop. B just encourages Rec and Park’s dysfunction and WILL increase your rent. Vote no on Prop. B.

Suzanne R. Dumont
San Francisco

Prop. B won’t help S.F.

Your editorial (“The real problem in parks department is shrinking funding,” Sunday) fails to even touch on the management of the Recreation and Park Department, its top-heavy executive staffing and its total lack of transparency.

For example, the Stow Lake lease debacle left a potential $1 million in rent on the table over the term of the lease based on the low guaranteed minimum rent enjoyed by the new vendor from New Mexico.

Adding insult to injury, the accessible bathroom, kitchen upgrades, indoor seating and “cozy coffee-house” room (all required in the lease) have not been constructed although the vendor took possession more than a year ago.

When Rec and Park can manage what it has, only then will I vote to give more money to McLaren Lodge. Vote no on Proposition B.

Cal Tilden
San Francisco

Sheriff helping inmates

We can now see the dramatic comeback of Sheriff Ross Mirkarimi (“Reinstated sheriff registers inmates to vote,” Sunday).

During his first week back in office he registered 400 inmates to vote, probably a state record. This is indicative of his respect for the inmates and his demonstration of that respect by empowering them in a way many of us take for granted.

Voting gives people a common ground for study and conversation, an enthusiasm for supporting candidates and issues in which we believe, and a part in the community. Inmates are physically separated from us, but with the help of efforts like this one, they can maintain a connection to their community and have a voice.

Vivian Imperiale
San Francisco

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