Navy investigates accusations of test cheating aboard nuclear submarines

AP file photo

AP file photo

WHAT: The Navy’s inspector general for the Atlantic submarine force is investigating claims that widespread cheating has tainted written exams administered to enlisted sailors and officers as part of their nuclear training.

HOW: Investigators already found that USS Memphis sailors were emailed answers before qualification exams, took tests without proctors and openly asked officers for answer keys. Whistle-blowers now charge such cheating is rampant aboard subs.

WHY: Submarine commanders competing for the highest proficiency ratings allegedly made exams so difficult that they have little to do with the skills that sailors from the engineering crews actually need for maintaining the vessels’ nuclear reactors.

Daily OutrageOpinionOther Opinion

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Health care workers would be the first group in the state to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. (Go Nakamura/Getty Images/TNS)
Hope on the way: Here’s what to know about California’s COVID-19 vaccine plan

The first batch of doses could hit the state as soon as early December

The Big Game was played Friday at Memorial Stadium in Berkeley. (Shutterstock)
Stanford blocks extra point to stun Cal, win 123rd Big Game 24-23

The 123rd edition of the Big Game featured a number of firsts.… Continue reading

Psilocybin magic mushrooms (Shutterstock)
‘Magic mushrooms’ moving into the mainstream

Efforts to decriminalize psychedelics could follow several different paths

The 2020 Census has concluded taking responses sooner than expected. (Courtesy photo)
What does California have to lose if undocumented immigrants are excluded from the census?

By Kim Bojórquez The Sacramento Bee If The U.S. Supreme Court rules… Continue reading

Those who stick around San Francisco on long holiday weekends can enjoy a slower pace, uncrowded streets and beloved institutions like cable cars. <ins>(Kevin Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>
These empty San Francisco streets: A holiday dream

We’re here because we can be, and because we have nowhere else to be

Most Read