More media bias about undocumented immigrants

“Why we should provide lawyers for immigrants facing deportation,” In My View, Nov. 29

More media bias about undocumented immigrants

Once again, Public Defender Jeff Adachi states his belief that San Francisco should provide lawyers for immigrants facing deportation. Yet nothing was mentioned on who will profit from such a program.

Again, no mention of the death of Kathryn “Kate” Steinle on July 1, 2015. Of course, not all undocumented immigrants are murders, but there are legal ways to migrate to the U.S. Many people do so daily.

Any crimes committed by so-called undocumented immigrants should also result in charges for Adachi and Mayor Ed Lee. Why, you may wonder? In theory, no one in the United States is above the law, especially politicians and public defenders. Aiding and abetting can be charged against anyone who helps in the commission of a crime, though legal distinctions vary by state. I am sure this applies to California, and protecting undocumented immigrants from deportation would classify as aiding them. Refusing to provide information to harbor and protect undocumented immigrants is the same as harboring and protecting criminals of any sort.

What does the San Francisco Examiner have to gain by San Francisco being a sanctuary city? Within a couple of months, the Examiner has published two articles in support of aiding undocumented immigrants and being a sanctuary city!

Adachi and Mayor Lee are so generous with taxpayers’ money to help people who are in the U.S. illegally, while many Americans are sleeping in tents on the cold streets of San Francisco, in danger of being harassed by the police and even jailed after 24 hours of being warned to take down their tent. Why not use the money to provide housing or livable shelters?

What about the next innocent person who is assaulted or murdered by an undocumented immigrant? Will people take to the streets to protest as they have about the election?

Chris J. Torres

San Francisco

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