Mexican soldiers on American soil

On June 22, Mexican soldiers clad in full-body armor and armed with AR-15 assault rifles invaded a private home, firing an estimated 100 rounds and killing its occupant. But this didn’t happen in Juarez, where a bloody power struggle between competing drug cartels has now spread to busy downtown streets. It happened in Phoenix.

Police officials initially claimed there was “no credible evidence” that members of the Mexican army were involved. But Mark Spencer, president of the Phoenix Police Enforcement Association, said officers on the scene reported that at least one suspect admitted “he was Mexican military,” whose “group targets drug dealers and their stash houses,” including the one on Cypress Street in Phoenix.

But this latest armed incursion into the fifth-largest American city was not a benign attempt to help U.S. officials fight the war on drugs. The warring Sinaloa and Gulf cartels are hiring Mexican soldiers to protect their interests — not ours. Spencer said the captured suspect also admitted that “they were planning on ambushing the [Phoenix police] officers following them, but didn’t only because they didn’t have any ammunition left.”

Many high-ranking police officials in Mexico have been killed by drug thugs. In the Mexican village of Villa Ahumada, the mayor and the entire 20-man police force resigned recently after six people — including three officers — were gunned down. U.S. law enforcement officials report that even members of drug cartel families are moving to Arizona to escape the violence, with moonlighting Mexican soldiers in hot pursuit.

In a June 2006 article in The American Spectator, Judd Slivka reported that Mexican troops were crossing the border hundreds of times while escorting drug traffickers, sometimes firing on outgunned local sheriff’s deputies and Border Patrol agents from .50-caliber machine guns mounted on the back of black Humvees. A Fox affiliate in El Paso filmed Mexican soldiers crossing the Rio Grande.

What was the federal government’s latest response to such repeated invasions of U.S. sovereignty? Withdrawal. “Operation Jump Start” — which sent National Guard troops to assist the Border Patrol while the “virtual fence” was being built — will end next month, against the strenuous objections of Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, Arizona Gov. Janet Napolitano and New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson, who correctly point out that the new system won’t be operational until at least 2011.

To date, neither of the two major-party presidential candidates have addressed these incursions. Voters should demand to know what Sens. Barack Obama and John McCain propose to do to stop the incursions and re-establish control of this nation’s borders. Protect the borders first, then talk about immigration reform.

General OpinionOpinion

Just Posted

A felled tree in Sydney G. Walton Square blocks part of a lane on Front Street following Sunday’s storm on Monday, Oct. 25, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
After the rain: What San Francisco learned from a monster storm

Widespread damage underscored The City’s susceptibility to heavy wind and rain

Plan Bay Area 2050 is an expansive plan guiding the region’s growth and development over the next three decades. The regional plan addresses progressive policy priorities like a universal basic income and a region-wide rent cap, alongside massive new spending on affordable housing and transportation infrastructure. (Shutterstock)
$1.4 trillion ‘blueprint’ would address Bay Area’s housing, transit woes

Analyzing the big ticket proposals in ‘Plan Bay Area 2050’

A felled tree in San Francisco is pictured on Fillmore Street following a major storm that produced high winds and heavy rains on Oct. 24, 2021. (Photo courtesy of Philip Ford)
Storm updates: Rainiest October day in San Francisco history

Rainfall exceeded 10 inches in parts of the Bay Area

On Sunday, California bore the brunt of what meteorologists referred to as a bomb cyclone and an atmospheric river, a convergence of storms that brought more than half a foot of rain to parts of the Bay Area, along with high winds, concerns about flash floods and the potential for heavy snow in the Sierra Nevada. Much of the Bay Area was under a flash flood watch on Sunday, with the National Weather Service warning of the potential for mudslides across the region. (NOAA via The New York Times)
Bomb cyclone, atmospheric river combine to pummel California with rain and wind

What you need to know about this historic weather event

The Department of Building Inspection, at 49 South Van Ness Ave., has been mired in scandal since since its creation by voter referendum under Proposition G in 1994. (Courtesy SF.gov)
The Department of Building Inspection, at 49 South Van Ness Ave., has been mired in scandal since its creation by voter referendum under Proposition G in 1994. (Courtesy SF.gov)
Whistleblowing hasn’t worked at the SF Dept. of Building Inspection

DBI inspectors say their boss kept them off connected builders’ projects

Most Read