Memories matter, not old landmarks

Another San Francisco icon is gone. The abandoned Fleishhacker pool house joins the Fleishhacker Pool, Sutro Baths, Playland at the Beach and countless other recreational venues that were enjoyed by city residents for years, only to overstay their welcome and fall into disrepair and ultimately extinction.

They closed the pool and put up a parking lot. Playland was replaced with condominiums, and as for the Sutro Baths, also destroyed by fire after being vacated, concrete ruins remain as a vague reminder of a long-lost era.

While many older residents lament the passing of yet another reminder of their childhoods, we should take stock of the knowledge that many of the places that make San Francisco a world-class city have been preserved and restored.

The Beach Chalet, which opened at roughly the same time as the Fleishhacker Pool in the 1920s, was at one time vacant but has been nicely rehabilitated, and its historic frescoes have been restored. The Beach Chalet is currently home to two restaurants.

The Cliff House is another local institution that continues to be a great destination overlooking the Pacific Ocean through countless incarnations since the 19th century.

We can’t save every building or amusement park ride that we remember from our childhoods, but it’s not the structures that we really value anyway.  We cherish the memories.

E. Michael Chelsky
San Francisco

Stop raiding Muni coffers

Regarding Supervisor Scott Wiener’s response to Muni’s latest service cut, he states that Muni is “not sustainable” and has a “structural deficit,” both big lies.

Every year, other city departments raid Muni for about ?$35 million to $50 million.  Every year for the past 10 or so years, Muni has had a deficit of, you guessed it, $35 million to $50 million, declared a fiscal emergency and cut service yet again.  In reality, there is no deficit!

The powers that be are just getting the public ready for the Transit Sustainability Project, which will probably come out next year.

In it, there will be massive service cuts that will turn Muni into the transportation of last resort that anybody with a car will refuse to use.

The only people who will frequently use Muni will be those with no other choice, such as kids, disabled people, older women who never learned to drive and those too poor to have a car.

Michael J. Benardo
San Francisco

Probe anti-depressants

I feel we need a congressional investigation into the role of Prozac in the mass shooting in Connecticut.

There is evidence that many gunmen in large shooting events were on Prozac or some similar anti-depressant.

Paul Kangas
San Francisco

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