Live-aboards bad for harbor

Harbor resident forced to sail on,” The City, Sunday

Live-aboards bad for harbor

Harbor management is doing the right thing by not allowing live-aboards in the San Francisco Marina. I am a 30-plus-year tenant of the harbor and for 10 of those years, I had my boat moored next to a live-aboard. The boat was filthy, smelled bad, never left the harbor (it would not run) and the owner flushed his toilet into the harbor right next to me every day.

Knowing that live-aboards were against harbor rules, I complained several times to the then-harbormaster. All they would do was write letters to the owner, who ignored them all. They even gave him a parking permit to park his car along the marina! He did not leave the harbor until the day he had a heart attack and the paramedics took him away.

Our harbor was never intended to provide low-cost housing for city residents. Kudos to present management for enforcing the rules.

Bruce Munro

San Francisco

Lees say farewell to longtime home,” The City, Wednesday

Stop the rush of evictions

Ellis Act evictions will increase as landlords and speculators monetize their property appreciation. With San Francisco market rates of two, five or even 10 times the controlled rent value, it's impossible to find housing after being evicted, and eviction compensation for tenants is a sad joke.

Here's a solution that could be implemented quickly and help evicted tenants stay in San Francisco: require the evicting owner to compensate the real cost to the tenant — enough to rent at market rate. Landlords and speculators should pay the real cost of evictions. When they do, the numbers will drop too.

David Qrady

San Francisco

Transit strike ban proposal gains steam,” The City, Wednesday

Let computers run BART

So, it took the deaths of two BART workers during the strike for BART management and BART worker union officials to agree on a contract, which now requires the approval of the rank-and-file and BART's board of directors. How long must this farce be drawn out, when the BART trains are mostly operated by automatic computer supervisory control from the central control center?

Back in the 1970s, I participated in an Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers field trip at the then-new BART computer control center that ran the trains using Westinghouse P250 computers. It would save the BART system money, improve efficiency and it would need fewer train operators.

Muni also runs streetcars on automatic control, especially through the Twin Peaks Tunnel. Computers and automatic control systems are far more advanced in 2013, to where they fly the nation's airplanes, drones and cars. Why are we spending so much money on worker's wages when computers are able to replace workers in most every segment in our daily lives?

Frank Norton

San Francisco

Blue Angels are a nuisance,” Letters, Opinion, Oct. 17

Keep out noisy Blue Angels

I agree with the recent letter to the editor regarding the Blue Angels.

The sudden, extremely loud noise also terrifies dogs and cats in addition to people. How safe is it to have the Blue Angels flying over a city? And could the money spent on the Blue Angels be put to better use?

Tourists have enough to see and do in San Francisco.

Brian Baum

San Francisco

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