Letters: Registries for hips, knees

“How informed are doctors?” Features, Nov. 2

Registries for hips, knees

We agree with Dr. Kevin Stone's call for improved tracking and surveillance of surgical procedures and devices as he mentioned in his article. As he notes, registries, which are large databases that allow researchers, physicians and other healthcare stakeholders to compare the effectiveness of surgical procedures, drugs, devices and other health care interventions, are a critical part of the solution to this lack of tracking and evaluation.

However, Dr. Stone omits to mention that there has been great progress to create and implement registries in the field of hip and knee replacement.

In California alone, there are two major registries: The California Joint Replacement Registry and the Kaiser Permanente Implant Registry, both of which track the effectiveness of the surgical approaches, devices and other factors. In addition, the California Joint Replacement Registry directly asks patients for their input about their pain and function both before and after surgery, on an ongoing basis, and provides this feedback to their surgeons.

Jeffrey P. Knezovich

Oakland

“Election loss doesn't halt protest,” The City, Friday

Grass is best for S.F., Earth

Even though The City recently mandated residents to remove concrete and gravel areas in front of their houses and plant grass, you can't say that San Francisco is at all serious in regards to removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere when it is replacing natural grass in Golden Gate Park with artificial turf.

If it was to save water, it would also be adding artificial turf to city golf courses.

It has been shown that fast-growing grass absorbs more CO2 from the atmosphere than from slow-growing trees. And that grass is more beneficial to the ecology by permitting rain water to be absorbed into the ground. As the CO2 is converted into oxygen, everything and everybody benefits.

Frank Norton

San Francisco

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