Letters: Keep City College open

➤ “CCSF enrollment takes big hit,” The City, Wednesday

Keep City College open

The Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges reviewing City College of San Francisco might do well to read a recent Oct. 28 front-page article in the New York Times where it was reported that Queens College of New York was rated ahead of the elite Ivy League universities. The subsequent point then made by U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan was that:

1. There is no current agreement on how best to rate colleges.

2. The standards for rating colleges are evolving.

3. There is not a one-size-fits-all standard that can be applied in rating different types of colleges.

Queens, albeit a four-year college, is somewhat like CCSF in that it was rated highly on affordability, access, satisfaction from alumni surveys, high transfer rates, students giving back to the local community and diversity (with half of the students born outside the U.S.).

Although such ratings and accreditation are not precisely connected, they would also not seem mutually exclusive. Could you imagine, for example, Queens College now losing its accreditation?

Unlike rating standards, it might be questioned why the ACCJC seemingly applies the same one-size-fits-all accreditation standards to a large urban community college serving the wants and needs of a diverse population, like CCSF, to a relatively small and mainly white college located in a nonurban setting.

Bob Marshall

<p> Part-time instructor at CCSF

San Francisco

➤ “BART labor policies unfair, suit claims” The City, Wednesday

Workers must heed BART

Excuse me! BART workers do not own BART, so why are they not accepting the decision of the BART management and elected board of directors who say that paid leave for medical emergencies would cost $10 million per year and make BARTs labor expenses “unsustainable,” and thus voted against its addition to the labor contract?

Also unsustainable is the unions’ right to strike. This also should be removed from the past union labor contract, before it is offered to the unions for approval, in place of the contract not signed off by the BART management and the board of directors.

Frank Norton

San Francisco

➤ “Croatian group sues Dylan,” Scoop!, Monday

Remembering genocide

The mass slaughter of many hundreds of thousands of Serbians, Jews and Gypsies in the “independent” state of Croatia during World War II was judged at Nuremburg to be genocide.

There are few Serbians living today who have not had some relative who perished in this little-known genocide, as they were second only to the Jews in the proportional loss of their population. I lost more than 100 of them during this unspeakable time of evil.

Croatia has yet to come to terms with its horrific past, as this lawsuit clearly demonstrates the state of denial that many Croatians are in pertaining to their sad past.

I hope that Bob Dylan successfully fights this ridiculous lawsuit to help put a stop to Holocaust revisionism.

Dr. Michael Pravica

Henderson, Nev.

➤ “City Hall making efforts to curb affordability issues,” The City, Nov. 27

Needy deserve housing aid

Subsidized housing should be for low-income residents. Those who are evicted by way of the Ellis Act are not necessarily low income.

Many are wealthy individuals who have had low rent for quite a while, which has helped them amass wealth, and also received a big check for moving out.

To put them ahead of a needy family to get subsidized housing would not be fair.

Tim Donnelly

San Franciscoletters to the editorOpinion

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