The Pacific Rod and Gun Club is seen from the shores of Lake Merced in San Francisco on Sept. 7, 2016. (Jessica Christian/2016 S.F. Examiner)

The Pacific Rod and Gun Club is seen from the shores of Lake Merced in San Francisco on Sept. 7, 2016. (Jessica Christian/2016 S.F. Examiner)

Letters: Gun club cleanup part of commercialization effort

Cost hits $18M to clean up former Lake Merced gun club site,” The City, Oct. 5
Gun club cleanup part of commercialization effort

Joshua Sabatini’s report on the $18 million to be spent cleaning up the Pacific Rod and Gun Club’s toxic mess skirts an important issue. Millions are being spent on renovating the area so that a consortium, called “Lake Merced Recreation LLC,” can commericalize it. The Marin-based consortium will charge atrocious rental fees — an hour on a double kayak with paddle and life preserver comes to $56 with tax! — and will rent out space to yoga instructors, a bike rental “nonprofit” and others while receiving “rent credits.”

This is but one more example of how taxpayers are subsidizing public space so that others can benefit financially.

Harry S. Pariser
San Francisco

SFPD pushes traffic safety measures as SF sees third pedestrian death in as many weeks,” The City, Oct. 5
To save lives, slow down intersection timers

One of the most pivotal reasons pedestrians get hit is the intersection timer. It’s way too fast. I’m a 55-year-old runner and I almost make it at the intersection of Van Ness Avenue and Market Street. Imagine someone over 80.

I was in Washington, D.C. a few years ago, and their timers are adequate. If you want less deaths, slow down the timer.
Art Alcantar
San Francisco

Ballot measure to close supervisor term limit loophole rumored to rise again,” On Guard, Oct. 3
Term limit ‘loophole’ for supervisors is no mistake

Joe Fitzgerald Rodriguez’s latest column gave the impression that there is a flaw in local elections, a “loophole” perhaps.

There is no loophole. Ordinary San Franciscans have struggled to compete with realtors, developers and Big Tech. District elections have been a huge victory for the distribution of power to working-class San Franciscans. But realtors, developers and Big Tech have been trying to erode district elections, and the neighborhood-based leaders that they have nourished, since 2000.

The problem is not that a seasoned, formerly elected official can run for his or her seat a few years later. The problem is all that money in politics, the ability of wealthy industries and rich people to buy their way into office and put measures on the ballot. Think how hard Airbnb, realtors and developers worked to defeat Aaron Peskin in his 2015 race to take back his old seat. They didn’t succeed, so their next tactic is to prevent other neighborhood former supervisors from running again.

Susan Vaughan
San Francisco

Bike capacity reduction on Caltrain is senseless

Bike riders don’t have enough bike capacity on Caltrain as is, and now they’re talking about decreasing it? Are they also talking about making the engines coal-burning? This is going backward in a ridiculous fashion, and it’s bad for the environment.

I frequently travel on Caltrain with my bike from San Francisco to San Jose to visit and help my 82-year-old father. I always get a place because I board at the end of the line, but I see huge numbers of bikes unable to get on. This is totally unacceptable. Is Caltrain trying to make all these people use cars? Does Caltrain want them not to use the train?

Caltrain needs 84 bike spaces per train (and 672 seats) to meet the board’s directive for electrified trains. I teach science, not math, but I don’t quite see how subtraction equals addition. And the proposed new car design? Lowest bidder? Really, just distribute the bike racks and seating through all the cars. This would cause less of a scrum and shorten boarding times, as well as be generally safer for everyone.
Caltrain, you can and must do better than this.

Ellen Koivisto
San Francisco

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Giants second baseman Donovan Solano scores on a double in the seventh inning against the Dodgers at Oracle Park on July 29. (Chris Victorio/Special to The Examiner)
Will the Giants make the playoffs? Kris Bryant may be the answer

By Chris Haft Special to The Examiner You’d be hard-pressed to find… Continue reading

Tiffany Carter, owner of Boug Cali West Coast Creole Shack in San Francisco’s La Cocina Marketplace, was dismayed by gentrification she found when she returned to her hometown to start a business. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
SF Black Wallstreet: Helping residents build wealth, reclaim spaces they’ve had to leave

Tiffany Carter moved back to her hometown of San Francisco five years… Continue reading

A prescribed fire at Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks was conducted in June 2016 to reduce hazardous fuel loading, increase watershed health, and restore the natural fire cycle in the Redwood Canyon area ecosystem. (Photo courtesy Rebecca Paterson/National Park Service)
Experts, UC scientists discuss wildfires in the state’s riskiest regions

Wildfires are nothing new in California’s history, but the magnitude and frequencies… Continue reading

Fourth-grade students at Lucerne Valley Elementary School don masks and Western wear for a “Walk Through California” history day during in-person instruction. (Courtesy of Krystal Nelson)
Confusion over mask mandate for California schools sparks tension between districts and parents

By Diana Lambert EdSource Shifting rules around mask mandates at schools are… Continue reading

Steven Buss, left, and Sachin Agarwal co-founded Grow SF, which plans to produce election voter guides offering a moderate agenda. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
Grow SF: New tech group aims to promote moderate ideals to political newcomers

Sachin Agarwal has lived in San Francisco for 15 years. But the… Continue reading

Most Read