Letters from our readers: Union must cooperate to improve Muni service

As long as the Transit Workers Union Local 250-A stands fast in attitude and refuses to enter into meaningful dialogue with management, there will be no improvement to Muni service. The top boss’s wage may indeed be questionable; but the matter at hand is how the hands of management are tied.

Management is told how they will schedule and or change schedules. Drivers are (by way of the union) telling management, “This is how things will proceed and there is no compromise. This must change.

William J. Coburn
San Francisco

Kudos to coverage, design

 

The Thursday Examiner had the best designed-and-delivered interview and endorsement procedure I’ve seen in this election cycle. It was the most digestible magazine-quality presentation around.

Within three pages they gave a double-spread of photos, bios, platforms and a full demographic breakdown of the District 6 specifics; then they slammed it home with their choices in all districts and an editorial defining their overall view.

Too bad one of my favorite District 6 candidates, James Keys, didn’t show up for interview meetings. That was a bad decision.

H. Brown
San Francisco

 

Going organic is healthful

The Environmental Working Group, a nonprofit organization advocating for policies that protect global and individual health, has issued a report based on the results of nearly 43,000 pesticide tests.Organic foods do have greater health benefits over conventionally grown fruits, vegetables and meats.

The greatest benefit is from higher levels of nutrients and antioxidants. The safest crop was eggplant, and the least was non-organic meats.

There was a reminder that organic standards were lower in other parts of the world, and that preservatives used in packaging can be highly toxic, while all food items are subject to extremely toxic gassings at the Mexican border.

Frank Norton
San Francisco

A white-collar crisis

The end of American prosperity dawned on me one day in 1974 while I was in college. I watched the evening news and witnessed five blast furnaces in Youngstown, Ohio, blown apart with demolition charges.

Starting with the end of World War II, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and Wall Street urged northern industries to move south for cheaper labor. With the rise of the national banks added to the mix, these forces persisted, championing border factories in Mexico, assembly plants in the Far East, steel from Brazil. And finally, total technology transfer to China as the final solution to cost of goods sold.

Now that the ultimate goal of freeing-up capital from illiquid infrastructure for more lucrative investments has been reached, it is puzzling to see all the recent hand-wringing editorials and op-ed pieces lamenting the passing of “Made in USA.”

I guess it was OK as long as the jobs lost were blue-collar. But what an absolute horror to be middle-class and middle-aged and suddenly realize that all the white-collar jobs are offshore as well.

Michael Korzen
San Francisco

lettersletters to the editorNEPOpinion

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Advocates want more public notice before SF euthanizes an animal

Animal control officials say web posting proposal would eat up resources, change few outcomes

State issues guidelines allowing places of worship to resume services

Local black ministers, civil rights leaders call for churches to remain closed

Republicans sue Newsom over vote-by-mail order for November election

By Laura Newberry Los Angeles Times Three Republican groups have sued Gov.… Continue reading

Krip-Hop Nation’s Leroy F. Moore Jr. is a born fighter

Pandemic won’t slow this artist, disability rights educator and activist

When should bars reopen?

San Francisco residents weigh in

Most Read