Letters from our readers: Traffic enforcement would negate subway

Market Street still hasn’t recovered from the years of BART construction. Do we want to risk that same fate with this questionable Central Subway?

Most of the traffic slowdown on Stockton Street is due to double-parked trucks. If the Municipal Transportation Agency would enforce the laws against that — including Muni double-parking — traffic would go much faster. Think of all the money we’d save and the problems we’d avoid.

Tim Donnelly, San Francisco

Subway is much quicker

The Central Subway trip-time comparison presented by the so-called “transit advocates” (actually, “slow-transit advocates”) is patently absurd. They assume that a three-block walk from Pacific to Clay takes 10 minutes (it is more like five minutes). They claim the 30-Stockton bus can travel from Pacific to the Caltrain station in 10 minutes (it is more like 25 to 30 minutes). And, they say the 30-Stockton runs on 2- or 3-minute headways (it is more like 5 to 10 minutes, with frequent bunching and delays).

In reality, overall travel time for the Central Subway will be about half that of the bus. The subway is currently being built and will provide a crucial rapid transit link to the densest and most congested part of The City. We now need to build a station at Washington Square, where the tracks will be extended under the current project so that rapid transit will be available to North Beach, Russian Hill and Telegraph Hill.

The slow-transit advocates will still be able to ride the slow, unreliable No. 30 bus, which will still survive after the subway line is opened.

Stephen L. Taber, Chair, SPUR Central Subway Task Force, San Francisco

Treasure Island mistake

The Sunday New York Times profiled the ambitious Treasure Island redevelopment, noting that its former executive director called it “a seismically unsafe toxic landfill 8 to 15 feet deep” atop an earthquake fault line.

Can someone explain why San Francisco is paying $55 million for the land, and a developer almost twice as much, to create a city that will likely be under San Francisco Bay by 2040 or 2050 unless the entire island is raised or the new buildings are constructed on stilts?

Arthur Young, Corte Madera

Harvard’s ties to Islam

Harvard Management Co., which manages Harvard University’s endowments, completely divested itself from investments in Israel at the beginning of Ramadan. It informed the Securities and Exchange Commission of its actions.

No reason was given.

Harvard Management has been working to become Sharia-law compliant. An Islamic finance project at Harvard Law School has been in development for the past few years. And, Harvard has benefited from an infusion of Wahhabi Saudi money.

Richard King, Palo Alto

letters to the editorOpinion

Just Posted

The Hotel Whitcomb on Market Street was one of many hotels that took in homeless people as part of The City’s shelter-in-place hotel program during the pandemic.<ins> (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
Closing hotels could disconnect hundreds from critical health care services

‘That baseline of humanity and dignity goes a long way’

Pachama, a Bay Area startup, is using technology to study forests and harness the carbon-consuming power of trees. (Courtesy Agustina Perretta/Pachama)
Golden Gate Park visitors may take a survey about options regarding private car access on John F. Kennedy Drive, which has been the subject of controversy during the pandemic.<ins> (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>
Your chance to weigh in: Should JFK remain closed to cars?

Host of mobility improvements for Golden Gate Park proposed

San Francisco supervisors are considering plans to replace trash cans — a “Renaissance” garbage can is pictured on Market Street — with pricey, unnecessary upgrades. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
San Francisco must end ridiculous and expensive quest for ‘pretty’ trash cans

SF’s unique and pricey garbage bins a dream of disgraced former Public Works director

Dreamforce returned to San Francisco in person this week – but with a tiny sliver of past attendance. (Courtesy Salesforce)
Dreamforce returns with hundreds on hand, down from 170,000 in the past

High hopes for a larger Salesforce conference shriveled during the summer

Most Read