Letters from our readers: Traffic enforcement would negate subway

Market Street still hasn’t recovered from the years of BART construction. Do we want to risk that same fate with this questionable Central Subway?

Most of the traffic slowdown on Stockton Street is due to double-parked trucks. If the Municipal Transportation Agency would enforce the laws against that — including Muni double-parking — traffic would go much faster. Think of all the money we’d save and the problems we’d avoid.

Tim Donnelly, San Francisco

Subway is much quicker

The Central Subway trip-time comparison presented by the so-called “transit advocates” (actually, “slow-transit advocates”) is patently absurd. They assume that a three-block walk from Pacific to Clay takes 10 minutes (it is more like five minutes). They claim the 30-Stockton bus can travel from Pacific to the Caltrain station in 10 minutes (it is more like 25 to 30 minutes). And, they say the 30-Stockton runs on 2- or 3-minute headways (it is more like 5 to 10 minutes, with frequent bunching and delays).

In reality, overall travel time for the Central Subway will be about half that of the bus. The subway is currently being built and will provide a crucial rapid transit link to the densest and most congested part of The City. We now need to build a station at Washington Square, where the tracks will be extended under the current project so that rapid transit will be available to North Beach, Russian Hill and Telegraph Hill.

The slow-transit advocates will still be able to ride the slow, unreliable No. 30 bus, which will still survive after the subway line is opened.

Stephen L. Taber, Chair, SPUR Central Subway Task Force, San Francisco

Treasure Island mistake

The Sunday New York Times profiled the ambitious Treasure Island redevelopment, noting that its former executive director called it “a seismically unsafe toxic landfill 8 to 15 feet deep” atop an earthquake fault line.

Can someone explain why San Francisco is paying $55 million for the land, and a developer almost twice as much, to create a city that will likely be under San Francisco Bay by 2040 or 2050 unless the entire island is raised or the new buildings are constructed on stilts?

Arthur Young, Corte Madera

Harvard’s ties to Islam

Harvard Management Co., which manages Harvard University’s endowments, completely divested itself from investments in Israel at the beginning of Ramadan. It informed the Securities and Exchange Commission of its actions.

No reason was given.

Harvard Management has been working to become Sharia-law compliant. An Islamic finance project at Harvard Law School has been in development for the past few years. And, Harvard has benefited from an infusion of Wahhabi Saudi money.

Richard King, Palo Alto

letters to the editorOpinion

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Some people are concerned that University of California, San Francisco’s expansion at its Parnassus campus could cause an undesirable increase in the number of riders on Muni’s N-Judah line.<ins></ins>
Will UCSF’s $20 million pledge to SFMTA offset traffic woes?

An even more crowded N-Judah plus increased congestion ahead cause concern

A health care worker receives one of the first COVID-19 vaccine doses at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital on Tuesday Dec. 15, 2020. (Courtesy SFgov)
SF to open three large sites for COVID-19 vaccinations

Breed: ‘We need more doses. We are asking for more doses’

San Jose Sharks (pictured Feb. 15, 2020 vs. Minnesota Wild at Xcel Energy Center) open the season on Monday against the St. Louis Blues in St. Louis. (Tribune News Service archive)
This week in Bay Area sports

A look at the upcoming major Bay Area sports events (schedules subject… Continue reading

Tongo Eisen-Martin, a Bernal Heights resident, named San Francisco’s eighth poet laureate. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Tongo Eisen-Martin becomes San Francisco’s eighth poet laureate

Bernal Heights resident Tongo Eisen-Martin has become San Francisco’s eighth poet laureate.… Continue reading

Homeless people's tents can be seen on Golden Gate Avenue in the Tenderloin on Wednesday afternoon, Dec. 16, 2020. (Photo by Ekevara Kitpowsong/S.F. Examiner)
Statewide business tax could bring new funds to combat homelessness

San Francisco could get more than $100 million a year for housing, rental assistance, shelter beds

Most Read