Letters from our Readers: Toy measure meant

The Sept. 16 Examiner op-ed by John Graham, “SF government’s new food fight will simply fatten bureaucracy,” asserts that legislation proposed by supervisors Eric Mar, David Campos and David Chiu to prevent restaurants from using toys to entice children into ordering unhealthful meals is actually intended to provide revenue for the Department of Public Health.

Nothing could be further from the truth. The ordinance does not authorize any new fees and the department does not intend to hire any new staff to implement the law. The ordinance takes on the important issue of childhood obesity and provides a common-sense remedy. In a world where children are constantly bombarded by unhealthful foods, it’s important that families have healthful choices.

Supervisor Eric Mar, Mitch Katz, Public Health Dept., San Francisco

Never leave children alone

I couldn’t believe a nanny would admit to leaving a child unattended for 20 minutes while she moved her car, as stated in your Wednesday story on nanny parking problems. There is no safe place to leave any child unattended. How many times a day or week is this child left alone? Is this not child endangerment?

What boggles my mind even more is that the parents are aware of this happening. I would get myself a reliable nanny who is more concerned with my child’s well being and is willing to take public transit.

J. Phillips, San Francisco

Stay in design’s spirit

The Music Concourse just completed millions of dollars of renovations, with the final stage being the fountains. Unfortunately, placing numerous food, Segway and bicycle vendors behind the band shell without an overall design plan detracts from the quality of this space.

We suggest consulting the Golden Gate Park Master Plan and following the spirit of this design, which is that of an attractive, high-quality area matching the dignity and spirit of the Music Concourse. This classic, peaceful space provides a beautiful respite for San Franciscans and visitors alike from the pressures and commercialism pervading our 21st-century society.

Katherine Howard, Friends of the Music Concourse, San Francisco

Civil rights violation

California’s idea to run 150 mph high-speed-rail trains 20 feet from Peninsula homes of low-income Hispanic, black and Asian families likely violates the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Instead of “burying and tunneling” the trains, as planned for San Francisco, in densely populated smaller Peninsula cities they only consider an elevated track alignment or “open trench.”

Both alignments require eminent domain forcible evictions of primarily Hispanic, black and Asian families living next to Caltrain tracks. The Civil Rights Act requires a “discriminatory impacts” study where federal funds are used. but no such study has performed, despite notification of violation prior to EIR certification.

Mike Brown, Burlingame

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