Letters from our Readers: Solar panel naysayers ignorant in green world

Your Oct. 20 lead article about neighbor complaints delaying solar panel installation is surprising. In today’s world, when California leads the country at going green and reducing our reliance on oil-based energy sources, we have two individuals worried about solar panels not being “in keeping with the character of the neighborhood.”

They also claim that if the panels faced more directly upright, “it would protect passers-by from falling panels in strong winds or during earthquakes.” But that would also make them ineffective and more susceptible to damage.

Solar panels actually increase the value of the average home, rather than degrading the neighborhood. I’m embarrassed for the naysayers’ unfounded and unsubstantiated arguments. I guess it’s up to the Board of Appeals, but haven’t we seen them get cold feet about sensible requests before?

Phil Stickney, San Francisco

Wall Street rewards unfair

While Main Street grapples with mounting job losses, home foreclosures and health insurance payments, Wall Street is in a state of euphoria. The villains of the financial meltdown, who escaped accountability and possibly long-term prison sentences, are now being rewarded with huge bonuses amounting to $140 billion.

Contrary to the White House rhetoric promising stricter regulations of banks, the House Financial Services Committee recently exempted 98 percent of the banks from annual oversights. In a bank-friendly gesture, Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner has proposed capital insurance to replace deposit insurance, which would immunize banks from losses and encourage reckless trading. An unhealthy nexus between Treasury, Wall Street and K Street is alive and well.

Jagjit Singh, Los Altos

Policies must follow law

Supervisor David Campos is whining that Mayor Gavin Newsom plans to ignore the policy of shielding illegal immigrants charged with felonies from the ICE by pointing out Newsom “took an oath to uphold the laws of this country.” One of the laws of this country bars illegal entry into it, a law that Campos himself chose not to follow.

Making The City a haven for criminals is not why voters passed the sanctuary ordinance.

John Brady, San Francisco

Supes should do their jobs

The City’s sanctuary policy violates federal law by illegally trying to trump a higher authority. This was also the case when officials tried to override state law by banning guns in San Francisco, which was struck down as unconstitutional.

When will the supervisors learn that they cannot run amok and pass laws that have no legal standing? How about actually running The City and doing what’s right for the citizens who live here, instead of continuing to nickel-and-dime us to death and tell us how to live our lives?

Edmund Lee, San Francisco

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