Letters from our Readers: Soda tax is fair way to treat poor parenting

Yes, charging an extra city tax on sodas will make it more expensive for “children” to buy, as well as adults, many of whom are on fixed incomes, and unlike children, have to pay rent and other necessities. So perhaps their parents would try to actually take control of what their children consume, rather than tax everyone for poor parenting.

It’s bad enough that adults without children are discriminated against in housing, can’t get any help from social services such as food banks and have to pay more in taxes, but this really is getting out of control.

Elizabeth Frantes, San Francisco

Where is the ‘compromise’?

I’m puzzled by the headline to Susan Ferrechio’s Sept. 17 article, “Compromise Adds to Chaos.” The article cites Democratic “concessions to Republicans such as dropping the government-run public health insurance option and leaving out an employer mandate.”

It was always my understanding that a compromise involved both sides in a dispute making concessions to reach a mutually acceptable goal. Democrats have made concession after concession, but I have yet to see a single Republican do so.
How can this accurately be called “compromise”?

Jim Swenson, San Francisco

Plastic bags litter streets

The Examiner’s daily front-page announcement, “This Newspaper is Printed Using Soy Inks on Recycled Paper,” is hard to reconcile with the irony between the millions of plastic bags that are scourging our landscape because of you. Why must you enclose every newspaper in a plastic bag, rain or shine? Detriment from your plastic bags could far exceed the benefits from your ink and paper.

Adding insult to injury, home distribution of your newspaper is unsolicited. I understand this “circulation” helps you sell advertising, but let’s be honest about the environmental impact of so many unwanted (and in many cases unwelcome) newspapers, in addition to the ramifications of all that nonrecyclable plastic.

Richard Leeds, San Francisco

Tired of being bumped

I am a Caltrain monthly pass holder who, along with other cyclists, is regularly bumped at the San Antonio stop. I occasionally have an early meeting and need to take this train, so now I always drive to work instead because I know I cannot rely on getting aboard. Ridiculous!

Matt Foist, Mountain View

Don’t ignore LGBT events

Your recent article about the dozen or so events filling city hotels this autumn omitted any mention of any LGBT events, particularly the two biggest annual street fairs — the Castro Street Fair and the Folsom Street Fair.

My brother and his partner came to San Francisco a year ago at the time of the Folsom Fair and could find few hotel rooms available in the whole city.

Charlie Spiegel, San Francisco

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