Letters from our Readers: Patrol Special Police not reliable officers

I prefer to have real San Francisco Police Department officers on foot patrol instead of private Patrol Special Police standing around. On several occasions, I have witnessed the so-called Specials refusing to do something about kids asleep in closed-up cars without any parent in sight, dogs inside grocery stores or blocking doorways, road rage in parking lots, etc.

Each time they say they can’t intervene because they aren’t paid to guard that particular place. But, they don’t seem to have any problem standing around chatting and drinking coffee at cafes. I know that I can ask an SFPD officer to look into something and they will do so. But, there is no certainty of getting help from some gun-toting glorified security guard in an SFPD copycat uniform. We can’t tell who has paid them to do what. Only true police officers can be relied upon to truly safeguard the public everywhere.

Andrea O’Leary, San Francisco

Glory of prep sports

As a former city high school quarterback at Balboa, I want to thank The San Francisco Examiner for your articles on the coming local football season in both high school and junior college.

These days, with the outrageous ticket prices for professional sports, the price of a scholastic ticket is extremely nominal. The time and effort these youngsters put in now will pay off after they leave school. I know that playing football in my teens instilled in me the teamwork, discipline and goal-setting that helped make my career a success.

If you haven’t attended one of these football events, get out of the house and support these fine young men.

Ed Baumgarten, San Francisco

Inevitable job losses

The likely loss of jobs at the Recreation and Park Department because stimulus funds are running out is just the beginning. The stimulus gravy train will end and unsustainable job-creation programs such as JobsNow are bound to halt abruptly.

In this case, we are left with 122 unemployed workers who, even if we put them on the public payroll, would ultimately become another unsustainable burden because of The City’s excessive employee compensation packages.

Matt Mitguard, San Francisco

Disruptive subway project

A Tuesday Examiner letter suggested that constructing the proposed Central Subway would be far less disruptive than the work on the Market Street BART and Muni because the Central Subway would have a deep tunnel as opposed to the “huge trench” on Market Street. This letter writer apparently wasn’t present when the Market Street subway was built.

Some sections of the Market Street subway were tunneled and others were built by cut-and-cover methods. In the cut-and-cover sections, temporary decking maintained streetcar, auto and pedestrian traffic while the construction proceeded relatively unnoticed underneath. Disruption along Market Street was invariably worse at the stations than anywhere else, which is exactly where the most disruption will be experienced if the Central Subway goes through.

G. Cauthen, Oakland

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