Letters from our readers: New constitution won’t solve state’s problems

We see headlines about Californians calling for the California Constitution to be rewritten. But the constitution is not the issue.
The issue is California’s checks and balances, which were ripped apart under the watch of the former 20-year Assembly leader.

The state auditor is not allowed to audit public funds without politicians approving. Whistle-blowers have no fair treatment at the University of California. The state attorney general and not the state auditor must be told of all whistle-blower complaints.
How can Californians expect their dollars to be spent wisely under such conditions that allow conflicts of interest to abound?

Calling for a new constitution is not the answer. Reviving the checks and balances into law is.

This would lead to a fairer business environment, greater prosperity and the return of a fiercely competitive two-party system.

Janet Campbell, San Francisco

Goldman Sachs unethical

In 2006 and 2007, Wall Street’s Goldman Sachs aggressively promoted more than $40 billion in “junk bond” securities as triple-A safe investments, backed by 200,000 risky mortgages as collateral. Unsuspecting investors such as pension funds and foreign banks purchased these junk bonds, which netted Goldman a huge profit.

Goldman Sachs was secretly betting that a sharp drop in U.S. housing prices would sink the value of these securities. It was only later that investors discovered that what Goldman had promoted as triple-A investments were closer to junk.

Goldman CEO Lloyd Blankfein commented that his bank’s huge profits were merely “doing God’s work.”

Tejinder Uberoi, Los Altos

Corruption is lesser of evils

The far-left talking points on foreign policy haven’t changed one bit in 40 years, if The Examiner’s Dec. 22 letter is any guide. So what if the Karzai government in Afghanistan is “corrupt” — just like the Thieu government in South Vietnam also was? In both cases the alternative — the Taliban now, the Viet Cong butchers then — is/was infinitely worse.

Anthony Brancato, San Francisco

Edits never criticize right

It’s a good thing that the trial lawyers buy the Democrats in Congress, because physicians who egregiously harm their patients need to be held accountable.

Meanwhile, there are no Examiner editorials criticizing Republican payoffs. So we can assume that the Republicans buy the Examiner editorials?

Richard Scherer, San Francisco

Rise in smokers alarming

After a plethora of advertising campaigns showing the dangers of smoking and how to help smokers quit, steep increases on cigarette taxes and less places where people can smoke, it is disheartening that adult cigarette smokers increased for the first time in 15 years, rising by about 1 percent.

Against great odds, it looks like the cigarette industry is winning the war, or at least holding its own. I guess it shows either how addictive cigarettes really are or how clever tobacco companies are.

Kenneth L. Zimmerman, Huntington Beach

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