Letters from our readers: Muni just lets problems with fare payment linger

Muni’s preference for interrogating transit riders instead of installing fare-collection systems that work properly is appalling. If Muni won’t replace the defective downtown fare gates, then fare inspectors need to be posted directly at the gates to witness payment or evasion. On buses, inspectors should stand at the back doors to direct riders to enter and pay at the front.

To really prevent fare evasion, instead of issuing $75 tickets, fare inspectors should start taking our $2 when the machines won’t. Just this morning on my commute to school, nearly every rider rode for free. The fare machine would not accept dollar bills, the Clipper card reader was malfunctioning and the bus was so crowded that the driver was waving people to enter at the back of the bus.

Amy Zehrin
San Francisco

 

Leading cynics’ charge

Mayor Gavin Newsom, District Attorney Kamala Harris and Supervisor Chris Daly are all seeking to escape the fiscal and legal cesspool that they created over the past decade. Would it not be ironic if they could not flee to Sacramento or Fairfield, but had to actually face the music and pay
the fiddler?

Those who govern have the obligation to abide by the consequences of their governance. Newsom, ­Harris and Daly all represent political opportunism and hypocrisy in the most cynical fashion.

Mike McAdoo
San Francisco

 

Shocking poverty rate

It amazes me that in America today, the poverty rate — according to the U.S. Census Bureau — is about one in seven people. Now we are told that more than one in five people in San Francisco — 150,000 — are living in poverty. They cannot feed themselves and require food assistance in addition to food stamps because many are homeless.

While jobs are plentiful and high-paying with great benefits in the public sector, private jobs are few and much lower-paying with lesser benefits. Look at the lavishly paid public jobs of the managers in small California cities such as Bell that our attorney general says he is investigating.

Frank Norton
San Francisco

 

Individuals vs. groups

Karl Rove is being tough on tea party activist candidates and soft on social issues. He displays the political arrogance of the GOP-entrenched guards. Rove praised Sens. Scott Brown and Olympia Snowe, who both have voted for the Dodd-Frank quotas bill. Sec. 342 would establish 20 offices to implement race-based hiring quotas in government agencies, public contracting, etc. The battle continues between individual rights and “group rights.”

Philip Melnick
San Francisco

 

Money matters

In the six months after the Israel-Hamas battle, the United Nations gave $200 million in aid to Gaza, but gave only $10 million to earthquake-ravaged Haiti. Yet, even in the face of new Palestinian-Israeli peace talks, Hamas continues to fire rockets at Israeli villages and schools.

Scott Abramson
San Mateo

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