Letters from our readers: MTA determined to improve bicycle routes

In response to the Sept. 26 letter regarding The City’s effort to paint bicycle routes in San Francisco, we have found that improving bicycle routes is a very low-cost approach to improving safety and comfort for everyone on the road.

The bicycle symbols with chevron arrows over them (“shared roadway markings” or “sharrows”) have been proven to reduce bicycle riding on sidewalks and wrong-way riding on the street and also encourage motorists and people on bicycles to position themselves more safely and predictably on the street.

We are constantly improving our roads for pedestrians, people who ride bicycles, transit users and drivers. We are mindful that a growing number of people are using bicycles for transportation purposes, and also drive cars, own property, purchase goods and pay the taxes and fees that fund much of these bicycle projects.

Nathaniel Ford
CEO, Municipal Transportation Agency
San Francisco

 

Religion and real estate

During the past few weeks, Mahmoud Abbas’ prosecutor general and Palestinian courts have reiterated and reinforced a long-standing law which obliges their government to execute anybody who sells a piece of land to a Jew.

The hysteria over the end of the construction moratorium Israel imposed on its own citizens in Judea and Samaria for 10 months while Abbas twiddled his thumbs can be understood in this context.

How can Israel talk peace with a partner that would kill its own people for entering into a real estate transaction with someone of a different religion?

Desmond Tuck
San Mateo

 

Boxer sticks to convictions

On the eight-year anniversary of the Oct. 11 Senate vote on the Iraq war resolution, which passed 77 to 33, we should remember that Sen. Barbara Boxer had the courage and common sense to vote “nay” on the resolution. The House had earlier passed the resolution.

Sen. Boxer’s vote on the Iraq war resolution is just one of the many reasons I am voting for her.

Ralph E. Stone
San Francisco

 

Misleading Prop. B data

<p>Quotes from an Examiner article, “Campaign against changes to city health benefits full of misrepresentations,” claimed opponents of Proposition B misrepresent the increased costs to families for their health insurance.

The costs cited in the article are also misleading because they do not calculate the total cost of all the increases proposed by Prop. B. Nowhere did the article mention that dental costs will also increase by $88 per month or $1,056 per year.

Add that to the increased cost of retirement contributions — another 1.5 percent increase, on top of the 7.5 to 9 percent that most employees now pay. Most readers will not do the math required to calculate the total cost for all Prop. B increases or add them to the amounts that public employees are currently paying.

San Francisco led the way to providing universal health care for our citizens. Lawmakers did not envision doing this by imposing the increases contained in Prop. B.

Mary Marzotto
San Francisco

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