Letters from our Readers: More media needs to stand up for cartoonist

I am glad that at least one newspaper in this area has the guts to discuss the cowardice of the media when it comes to Islamic intimidation. The death threats against the Seattle cartoonist are just the most recent example. There were previous threats against the producers of “South Park.” Even the Yale University Press censored a book about the Danish cartoons that depicted Muhammad.

A press is not free if people cannot write without fear of physical harm. Shame on the American press corps for not taking a stand like this newspaper did!

Gil Stein, Aptos

Subway plan outrageous

I ride the Muni T-Third Street line six days a week. While I much preferred the 15 bus, which it replaced, the T does provide good connections to BART, the other Muni lines and the ferries at the Embarcadero station. When I read a recent letter in your paper regarding the proposed Central Subway, I thought the writer was joking about the three-football-field length walk I’ll have to make for Market Street transfers once the subway is complete.

However, when I called Muni they confirmed this is true and they advise that there will be no people movers to assist the transferring passengers. This is outrageous. If it happens, I’m no longer going to use Muni — I’ll drive. I can’t believe The City thinks it wise to spend $1.6 billion to essentially ruin the T line.

Dorothy Devere, San Francisco

Travails of city living

From San Francisco’s ticket-happy and parking-metered city streets, motorists take the shortest route out of town for free parking and lower-cost shopping. With fewer jobs, families have moved out of The City, as have the many businesses that left behind empty shops.

A safer city is one where you can go out to the park and walk at night without worry of being knifed or shot. Without money in your pocket, you cannot make purchases, and consequently there is no purpose in going to the local shopping area.

Frank Norton, San Francisco

Politicians don’t donate

I just received the annual letter from a charity that raises funds to help the Bay Area’s needy during the holiday season. I always look at the list of donors, and you can always count on certain San Franciscans known for their generosity — such as the Haas Family, the Rock Family, the Goldmans and the Osher Foundation — to be at the top of the list.

However, over the years, whenever I look from the top to the very bottom of the list, I never see the name of an elected politician. I don’t see the mayor, the district attorney or a member of the Board of Supervisors. I don’t see anyone local who is in the state Senate, the Assembly or in Congress.

I guess they are really good at giving away other people’s money, but not so good at giving away their own.

Richard Beleson, San Francisco

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