Letters from our readers: Lincecum deserves his second Cy Young win

Even though some writers don’t seem to “get it” when it comes to who should be voted into baseball’s Hall of Fame, it appears that when voting for the Cy Young winner they are becoming more and more understanding of what it takes to get the nod.

Both Zack Greinke and Tim Lincecum played for teams that had a heckuva time scoring runs, and yet the two pitchers managed to keep their respective teams in the game.

It’s fair that the voters compared the statistics, both the pitchers and the runs scored for said pitcher, because if you are always backed with 4-6 runs an outing you really should have a high win total. But if you’re winning when your mates are only scoring 1, 2 or 3 runs, you’re earning every W because there’s so little margin for error.

Usually the solo home run isn’t costly, but it is if your team only scores one itself. So I tip my cap to the voters for this year’s Cy Young award winners, because the better pitcher did win in their respective leagues.

Kevin J. Marquez
San Francisco

Rent stabilization dated

The original 1978 passage of the Rent Stabilization Ordinance was intended to be only temporary. Now some 31 years later it is still in effect and repeatedly amended to make it harder on rental housing providers. Rent Stabilization has been a deterrent to the addition of rental housing.

The original ordinance exempted the construction of rental housing built after 1979. This was a pledge that The City would not “seize” properties and put them under the Rent Control Ordinance. Rent control does benefit those currently living in rent-controlled units, but it deters more rental housing because providers are fearful of their property being placed under the ordinance.

Where is any data to demonstrate that evictions in post-1978-constructed buildings is a problem?

James A. Lew
San Francisco

City is safe for pedestrians

In reporting the death of a pedestrian on Nov. 19, you placed two irreconcilable statistics side by side. The unfortunate death was pedestrian fatality No. 23 for 2009. This has been about average for San Francisco for the past five years. In the same story, you repeated a meaningless statistic — that San Francisco pedestrian fatalities are half of the total traffic deaths in The City, which is four times higher than the national average. What does that analysis tell us about fatal traffic accidents? Nothing!

By any objective measure, San Francisco is one of the safest walking locales in America, as well as one of the safest major cities for driving. A total of only 50 traffic fatalities a year, given all the visitors and commuters, along with all forms of transportation seen here, make this city a pretty safe place to get around. Those who want to spread fear with numerical lies are simply advancing their own agenda.

Ted Loewenberg
San Francisco

Simple solution? Not in SF

So The City is in a deficit and the roads need money to be fixed. Step up traffic enforcement on Duboce Street between Noe and Castro streets for cars, anywhere in the Lower Haight or Mission districts for bikes — and fare-check the buses. Of course, that’s an easy, obvious answer and this is San Francisco we’re talking about.

James Sam
San Francisco

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