Letters from our Readers: How do other utilities stack up against PG&E?

Today, there are several California municipalities that operate their own municipal power utilities. Perhaps Thursday’s explosion of a PG&E pipeline in San Bruno could inspire us to compare how well or poorly those municipal utility companies maintain their infrastructure relative to PG&E?

Such a comparison would be especially informative because of PG&E’s recent, ongoing and invariably expensive attempts to craft and influence legislation designed specifically to exclude competition and shift liabilities onto the company’s customers.

Riley B. VanDyke, San Francisco

A taxing situation

I believe congratulations are in order for the powers-that-be under the dome of San Francisco’s City Hall. Once again, they have proven San Francisco to be “The City that can do!”

Ike’s thriving sandwich shop in the Castro was closed because of a slight discrepancy in a single permit, while a person with connections maintains his nightclub business in the Inner Mission even after the revelation of permit omissions and illegal clubbing atop the building.

Other cities can certainly take up the slack and get the taxes while San Francisco dwindles away.

William J. Coburn, San Francisco

City adds to its problems

Last year, 9,899 companies in The City closed their doors. The policies of our supervisors are working well. Now they need to hire more than the 36 outreach workers they have in order to get more people hooked on welfare. Keep up the sanctuary policy, too. Then we can have everyone on welfare. Start hiring more prison guards. We’re going to need them.

Jim Duncan, San Francisco

Penny for your thoughts

It’s nice that the Coins for Kids Partnership will be collecting people’s extra coins this month to aid the schools. But what does it say about our priorities that the school system must beg for spare change to properly educate our children, while the Pentagon and “defense” industry gobble up trillions? Last spring, 180 teachers and 100 aides received their pink slips, and more layoffs and program cuts are in the cards.

Barry S. Eisenberg, San Francisco

A cherished right

There was a time when our courts protected the rights of all citizens to vote. Now, a decision by U.S. District Judge Richard Seeborg will ensure that for many San Franciscans this cherished civil right is basically pointless. While acknowledging the city’s flawed ranked-choice voting system can leave many voters with no voice in the final balloting — by artfully saying ranked voting “does exert some burden on voting rights” — Judge Seeborg nonetheless shamefully ruled that governmental interests for expediency trump the voters’ right to deliberate fully upon candidate choices for important public offices.

Dwayne Jusino, San Francisco

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