Letters from our Readers: Hotel strikers, clean up after yourselves

I am not aware of the reasons behind the picketing in front of the San Francisco Hilton, nor do I care. However, the signs, newspapers and trash that littered the street afterward did not go unnoticed. The demonstrators should pick up after themselves. It is not society’s responsibility to take care of them or the mess left behind.

Jared Anders, San Francisco

Train speeds are dangerous

Union Pacific freight hauling is “green,” keeping 18-wheelers off freeways. Freight companies invested $700 billion for infrastructure tracks to accomplish this. California High-Speed Rail Authority wants to use Union Pacific’s right-of-way to run 220-mph trains within 10 feet of freight lines.

Union Pacific’s environmental response report letter warned of “safety risks inherent” if high-speed rail is placed near freight. “A freight train derailment that coincides with passage of a 200-plus-mph HSR train … could result in one of the worst rail accidents in American history, with dozens or even hundreds of fatalities.”

With elevated “aerial viaduct” tracks installed in San Mateo, a major derailment accident would propel trains onto innocent homes located underneath.

Mike Brown, Burlingame

Vocational tech

Other states have different levels and types of public education available to help all, and for a lot less money per student than California.

My home state has one of the world’s largest and most active airports staffed mostly by mechanics who trained in the excellent public tech schools. But California tech schools are private and massively expensive.

The only options for young Californians interested in gaining a vocational tech degree is to pay the price of the extremely expensive “private” tech schools, join a feudal system of union apprenticeship or leave the state entirely.

There goes California’s hope for the future.

Janet Campbell, San Francisco

Attack ads don’t help cause

I understand that demonizing the opposition is just part of how the political game is played. The U.S. economy is a mess. You would think everyone in our government would be working together to fix it. But President Barack Obama and Democrat ads attack the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. The Chamber is made up of people from our own communities. My local real estate agent, doctors, coffee shop owner, dry cleaners and the bakery are all part of the Chamber. These are businesses I support. That means the Democrats are attacking my friends and neighbors.

The message I am left with is, “Don’t start a new business and don’t support the Chamber.” Demonizing the U.S. Chamber of Commerce means our own government is hurting our communities. I will support my community by not voting in support of stupid ideas.

Richard King, Palo Alto

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