Letters from our Readers: Green Party candidate did not break any laws

The Green Party candidate for California governor, Laura Wells, was arrested by police and hauled away just before she was about to enter Angelico Hall at Dominican College in San Rafael to attend the Brown-Whitman gubernatorial debate. And what was her crime? Was she making a commotion? No, she was just guilty of having a verified ticket to the event and calmly walking inside.

This outrageous injustice was completely outside the bounds of what is permitted in a supposed democracy.

Don Havis, San Mateo

No trade-deficit solution

Amid the noise from Capitol Hill to pass the so-called Currency Reform for Fair Trade Act, I was glad to see The Examiner’s Oct. 8 editorial, “Blaming China won’t help US manufacturing.” Raising Chinese currency value won’t help much in reducing the U.S.-China trade deficit. On the contrary, it would increase our import costs and put an extra burden on purchasing daily necessities.

A strong Chinese yuan would reduce Americans’ real income, further weakening U.S. demand and perhaps ruining the fragile U.S. recovery. The main reason for huge U.S.-China trade imbalance is due to the global manufacturing pattern, especially the different industrial structures.

No matter how hard I try, our import business is always larger because we import dehydrated garlic from China, which is the world garlic-growing center. Our Gilroy farmers just can’t grow enough garlic for the American market. From an export point of view, I would suggest our government loosen some restrictions on exports of our high technology, which made our trade deficit even worse.

George Ouyang, San Francisco

Election ads create jobs

One improvement on the job front is in election advertising. Formerly, politicians didn’t spend money in California because we are a one-party state. The Republicans thought we were a lost cause and the Democrats didn’t need to advertise. But now the widespread economic malaise makes the GOP feel they have a chance and makes the Democrats feel threatened. The advertising agencies and sign printers are temporarily prospering.

See the advantage of being middle of the road?

James Keefer, San Francisco

More help for unions

The now-widely debunked smear attacks from the White House on financial contributions to the U.S. Chamber of Commerce seem designed to build up support for a bill coming up right after the elections to allow unions special favors in new laws on campaign financing — this time it’s the Disclose Act.

The bill apparently denies First Amendment rights to private companies and nonprofit groups while giving labor unions and a few other powerful interest groups huge exemptions to disclosures about who is funding their campaigns.

Janet Campbell, San Francisco

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