Letters from our Readers: Don’t vote angry; Look for a good plan

I think one thing we can all agree on is — voters are angry this year.

The Republicans are trying to capitalize on the anger and direct it against Democrat incumbents. However — no amount of anger is going to solve America’s problems. I’m sure each and every one of us has noticed that decisions we make from anger often are decisions we later regret.

This year voters have a choice to either vote their anger, or try to figure out which candidate has the best plan to actually help solve our country’s problems. So when you listen to candidates this year, ask yourself if the candidate has a plan or is trying to inflame you in order to suppress good judgment. We have to ask ourselves if we still want to be angry 10 years from now, or do we want to look back and be proud we made the right choices.

Marc Perkel, Gilroy

Projects are no picnic

I would just like to say to anyone that doesn’t live in the Hunters Point project or any of The City projects that have not been rebuilt to come and try to live in them — with all the bad heating and plumbing; outdated insulation; concrete floors and overrun trees. Not to mention all the spotty patchwork they have done over the years.

Just in case you think all of us live here because we don’t have jobs, we have jobs and we pay taxes. And if you are living in one of those quaint older homes in San Francisco, I suggest you check for lead because we have that too.

Delrecia Booker, San Francisco

Death and taxes

The Senate appropriations bill included a provision to pay the family of deceased senator Robert Byrd his salary of $193,400 for the upcoming fiscal year. It turns out this payment to senatorial families is a long-standing tradition. So as of 2011, when taxpayers die, their estate will pay 55 percent in estate taxes. But when a senator dies, the taxpayers pay the family 100 percent of next year’s salary.

Richard Beleson, San Francisco

Whitman’s worries

We enforce our immigration laws with the same nonchalance we enforce speed limits. Candidate Whitman and her former housekeeper are simply the latest to get run over. Inept legislators have allowed immigration policy to metastasize from a manageable legal problem into a full-blown legal and human rights cancer. One knows that the situation has reached a new level of absurdity when camera-chasing attorney Gloria Allred exploits the issue as if she really cares about her latest self-promotion vehicle.

Matt Mitguard, San Francisco

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