Letters from our Readers: Crescent Cove residents gouged by agreement

I was forced to buy Dish satellite TV when I moved into in the new Crescent Cove apartment complex. I would not have moved there had I known that somehow AT&T got an exclusive agreement for all telecommunications and could charge the highest prices, give the poorest service and make twice as much per user than I could have paid just two blocks away, where tenants have a choice.

Nobody in this complex has a choice for television, telephone landline or Internet because the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency and Mayor’s Office of Housing signed an agreement that benefited AT&T and gouged San Franciscans living in subsidized housing. Dish is twice as expensive at this complex as it is two blocks away.

Who got political contributions from AT&T for this deal?

Stu Smith, San Francisco

 

Adding to parking woes

The proposal to extend San Francisco parking meter hours is great, but it just doesn’t go far enough.

What our local government should do is take The City, which already has insufficient parking for its residents and visitors, and deliberately make it worse in order to extort more revenue from parking tickets.

The City should have hundreds of no-parking bus zones that Muni doesn’t even use (when is the last time you saw a bus actually pull all the way into a bus stop and allow traffic to get around it?). City Hall could size metered parking spaces randomly, so a section where two cars might easily fit is laid out for just one. Also, you could have street cleaning at the crack of dawn in many residential areas of The City, increasing the likelihood of people getting tickets.

Oh, wait — all this is already being done. Never mind.

Patrick Maund, San Francisco

 

Where’s the outcry?

China has 600 companies in Africa and more than 850,000 Chinese living there. More lumber from the Ivory Coast is cut and sent to China than from all other countries in the world combined.

Where is the outcry of “imperialism” and “profit mongers” from the Berkeley left-wingers? Could it be the left is not against capitalism, they just don’t like Europeans or Americans?

Philip Melnick, San Francisco

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