Letters from our Readers: Common sense should prevail in pets debate

Nobody is saying “let’s endanger people’s health” over the issue of tenants’ pets. Common sense is the way to go. Which came first: The allergic tenant or the dog? There is your answer.

If a dog leaves a mess on the floor in the lobby and nobody cleans it, that isn’t the dog’s fault, it’s the tenant’s. Are you telling me that your tenants don’t commit similar infractions with their garbage? If a dog bites another person, the owner and the animal are summarily punished.

The way that humans live together is by courtesy and common sense.

Chris Hollstein, San Francisco

Too many dogs

Is there no end to attempts at inserting dogs into every nook and cranny of San Francisco living? The Board of Supervisors should better address how to limit the number of pro-dog activists who dominate the Animal Control and Welfare Commission and browbeat the rest of us to accommodate self-serving decisions.

Andrea O’Leary, San Francisco</p>

Keeping mum on ‘don’t ask’

When is President Barack Obama going to end the ban on gays in the military policy known as “don’t ask, don’t tell”? Don’t ask because he isn’t going to tell.

Marc Perkel, Gilroy

Support health care reform

We must support the president’s health care reform and insist upon a viable public option. It is imperative for all us citizens who are crying out for relief from the shyster insurance companies that are killing us with their increased premiums and denial of coverage.

Marlon Woodward, San Francisco

Leave Guantanamo as is

I’m pleased to see the ongoing delay in the process of closing the Guantanamo Bay prison. I hope that before it closes, President Barack Obama and the ACLU will see the folly in bringing terrorist killers into the U.S. Now that the world already knows we failed to pamper our enemies held in detention there, why not just keep them there?

Those bleeding-heart Americans, and Congress, should be satisfied by simply placing an appointed watchdog to oversee operations there. Consider the expense of moving the prisoners to prisons around America, and the potential danger unnecessarily thrust on the communities surrounding those institutions when they become targets for terrorist revenge.

It is also known that Islamic extremists have been working hard to convert our prison population to the Islamic faith. Do we really want enemy soldiers to enter into that mix?

Barry Bradley, San Francisco

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