Letters from our readers: City’s law enforcement priorities out of whack

I was walking in front of 101 California St. at 3:35 p.m. when I saw a meter maid with tow trucks hooked up to a car that had disability plates and a little dog in the front seat. I asked what they were going to do with the dog and was told it would be taken to Animal Control.

I asked them to cut the owner some slack due to the dog and disability plates. No way. They hooked it up and off they went. So now we had a disabled citizen who would come out of the building to find car and pet gone. By the time the owner found out where the little dog was, it would probably be kept overnight at the pound.

Of course the owner owes a fine. But this is a city that gives sanctuary to criminals, yet can’t cut some slack to a disabled person and an innocent little pet, who both undoubtedly were traumatized by what they got needlessly put through.

Nancy L. Leatham
San Francisco

Government wastes funds

So now we find out President Barack Obama’s stimulus plan created 997 transportation jobs in the Bay Area at a cost of $660 million — or $661,981 per job. I’ve got a grand idea. Let’s give the government another $1 trillion to “reform” health care.

Scott Abramson
San Mateo

S.F. doomed to decline

According to your Nov. 24 story, city residents will be in for a bumpy ride before the streets are repaired. Back in the 1950s, President Dwight D. Eisenhower completed the U.S. Interstate Highway system at huge expense — opening the economy to higher levels.

Ike knew that it was road building that made the Roman Empire the great state it became. Without good streets, San Francisco will follow a bumpy road to decline, as Rome eventually did.

Frank Norton
San Francisco

Voters need to wake up

As long as voters continue to re-elect the “same old boys,” we make the lazy mistake of thinking that time “in the chair” equals experience. It doesn’t. It only lets the most experienced vote-panderers stay in office.

The only way to get true reform in the California Legislature is to replace the players. Elect new enthusiasts willing to address hard problems rationally. We’re their employers, and it’s time to start issuing pink slips.

J. G. Miller
San Mateo.

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