Letters from our readers: Blighted Mid-Market needs serious repair

Will mid-Market Street ever rise above exploitative strip shows, vacant storefronts and predatory check cashing places? The Redevelopment Plan, which took 12 years to develop, would have dedicated arts funding for the area, strongly encouraged building owners to improve their property and mandated a hefty portion of affordable housing.

Any new housing developments were limited to rental only. But that was not enough. Prop. D’s state of the art billboards could have turned around the definition of the neighborhood. Critics screamed blight. The irony was stunning.

Next year a new supervisor will be elected in District 6. I challenge candidates to fight the status quo, make mid-Market Street a priority and bring us a sustainable plan to rehabilitate the heart of The City.
 
Lynn Valente, San Francisco

 

 

State upgrade essential

An upgrade is needed for the state’s computer systems. The systems can’t be older; it’d be better to do maintenance and replace them now. Due to the antiquated systems, state officials have been forced to spend more hours entering data manually, which may cause trouble.

The slow systems cause many projects to be delayed; it’s embarrassing. If California can’t get it now, who can?

Anna Rassameekobkul, San Francisco

 

Proof Santa Claus exists

I am glad the U.S. Postal Service has come to its senses and found a way for the small town of North Pole, Alaska, to process children’s letters to Santa Claus. Virginia, there really is a Santa Claus after all.

Kenneth L. Zimmerman, Huntington Beach

 

No justice in BART trial

There have been outbursts of joy as the judge moved the “BART murder” to Los Angeles — but for what seem to be the wrong reasons. It has been decided that the former BART police officer would not be able to gain justice within the Alameda County courts. Will true justice be served by moving a trial to an area where it is deemed more demographically favorable to one of the parties involved?

William J. Coburn, San Francisco

 

Subway facts misleading

A couple of corrections are in order for the Nov. 18 Examiner story about the Central Subway project. The Metropolitan Transportation Agency contends that “when fully completed … the $1.58 billion project, projected to be up and running by 2018, could carry as many at 100,000 daily passengers.”

But the 100,000 daily passengers would include the passengers riding the already completed T-Third line. The number of new riders attracted by the $1.58 billion subway is less than 20,000 a day, according to the environmental impact report. And even this much-smaller number is not expected to materialize before 2030, long after the project is fully completed.

Gerald Cauthen, Oakland

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