Letters from our Reader: Give chief the power to police his own

Our police officers need the benefit of the doubt today more than ever. They are constantly being judged by the media and by people without the benefit of the “full picture” due to privacy laws and ongoing investigations.

But like any large orchard, the SFPD ranks contain “bad apples” that must be dealt with swiftly for the benefit of the public, the Police Department and even the accused officer. It is nearly impossible to get fired from the SFPD once you pass probation. Chief George Gascón deserves the power to “police” his own department. Right now he doesn’t have that.

Kaiser Wexler, San Francisco

Frantz column spot on

Bob Frantz’s Oct. 19 column (“Limbaugh never stood a chance to land NFL team”) should be mandatory reading by league Commissioner Roger Goodell and all the countless hypocrites who turn a blind eye to rapists, murderers, drug addicts, domestic abusers, steroid users, dog killers, ad nauseam. Nice to know we have such sterling characters protecting the integrity of
pro football.

B.J. Sullivan, San Francisco

Path to less expensive care

The Examiner quoted Nebraska Sen. Ben Nelson on Oct. 19 as saying, “Without more people in the pool, you run the risk of adding additional costs to people’s premiums.” Perhaps that’s why Nelson voted for Sen. Charles Schumer’s public option amendment in the Senate Finance Committee, to force health insurance companies to compete against a nonprofit insurance provider and thus lower costs for everybody.

Michael Zonta, San Francisco

We give The City enough

Every San Franciscan should ask two questions about the plan to extend San Francisco parking meter hours to Sunday and the late evening hours: Why do our supervisors need to take more money out of the pockets of San Franciscans when they already have a $6.8 billion budget? And why can’t they run a city the size of San Francisco on a budget that size, which is already bigger than that of 20 states?

Until they can answer those questions, they have no business asking San Francisco residents to pay more.

E. F. Sullivan, San Francisco

Rail line will ruin city

Few issues facing Burlingame today are more important than the impact of high-speed rail. Contrary to popular belief, this is not an issue far off in the future. Project plans are being made right now, with construction on the San Francisco to San Jose segment set to begin in 2011.

This has already had a noticeable effect on property values in Burlingame near the Caltrain line, because realtors are now required to disclose these plans. The threat of an elevated railway looming over and bisecting our city is simply not acceptable.

Beth Beisecker, Burlingame

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