Letters: Body cameras work well

Protests over New York grand jury decision not to indict police officer

Body cameras work well

The massive public reaction to the tragic deaths of young black men at the hand of white police officers has led to a national call for use of body cameras to record and prevent any future mistreatment of suspects.

There is ample precedent. Animal-protection activists have used body cameras to document egregious atrocities and safety violations by workers in the meat, dairy and egg industries.

The resulting videos have led to a number of corrective actions, as well as felony convictions, meat recalls, and even a $500 million civil settlement. Sadly, agribusiness interests in seven states (Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, North Dakota, and Utah) have enacted ag-gag laws imposing severe penalties for using body cameras in their facilities. The language is typically drafted by anti-consumer groups.

Let's hope that other vested interests do not impose similar restrictions on the use of body cameras by law enforcement officers.

Sal Fuentes

San Francisco

“Ticked off at Lyme disease,” Healthy Living, Wednesday

Find help for Lyme disease

Entertainer Debbie Gibson was featured on the cover of the August Lyme Times magazine because she spoke the truth about her struggle with Lyme disease, a bodywide inflammatory bacterial infection.

We have thousands of cases in California now, and 10 known cases acquired in San Francisco. Only 20 to 30 percent get the telltale bull's-eye rash. Most people suffer for years before figuring it out, and are usually misdiagnosed with fibromyalgia, autism, MS, ALS, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, etc.

Please visit www.lymenet.org to learn how to protect yourself.

Robin Krop

San Francisco Support, Education & Advocacy for Lyme

San Francisco

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