Letters: Airbnb rentals good for SF

“Short-term rental law up for board vote,” Sept. 30, The City

Airbnb rentals good for SF

Today, the Board of Supervisors meet to discuss regulations on short-term rentals. Before that happens, it's important to consider the incredible value short-term rentals bring to The City.

The short-term rental economy is in the DNA of San Francisco's entrepreneurial spirit, and through such innovation, the community has derived very real economic benefits. Travelers rely on short-term rentals for various reasons, including the need to accommodate larger families that would otherwise require multiple hotel rooms, travelers with special needs or special-needs children, or simply a desire for more lengthy affordable stays. Quite simply, for many it's the difference between living like a local or just visiting.

Regardless of the reason travelers choose short-term rentals, numerous studies have shown that those in short-term rentals stay longer and spend more money during their travel versus hotel stays. San Francisco should embrace this economic opportunity not stifle it.

The City should adopt sensible regulations that apply to all short-term rentals so that travelers, owners, hosts and property managers, The City, and the surrounding communities can all benefit from the great economic opportunity that short-term rentals offer.

Matthew Kiessling

Executive director,

Short Term Rental Advocacy Center

San Francisco

“New group pushes for more housing,” The City, Thursday

The City needs new housing

Sonja Trauss, the former Philadelphia math teacher, is spot on with her arithmetic: Build more housing to meet all demands of the housing sector.

San Francisco suppressed middle-class rental housing construction with the passage of the rent ordinance in 1979, and again in 1994, when the rent ordinance was expanded to include even two-unit buildings.

To set sail toward the goal of solving the housing crisis, the anchor must be weighed. By removing the threat of ever-expanding rent-control measures, developers will once again build new middle-class rental housing.

That will both reduce rents while satisfying market demand. After more than 34 years of failure of rent control to control rents, it is time to end the experiment and remove rent control.

Ted Loewenberg

San Francisco

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