Lawmakers should take clue from Thomas More

Melissa Griffin’s columns about San Francisco’s state legislators seemed entirely based on what new laws they have sponsored. I was reminded of a passage from Thomas More’s “Utopia”:

“They have few laws, as people so trained do not need many. The chief criticism they bring against other people is that an infinite number of books of laws and commentaries is not enough. The Utopians think it most unjust that any man should be bound by laws that are either too numerous to read or too obscure for anyone to understand.”

Is the last part of that a fair description of the situation in California?

If it is, do our San Francisco legislators bear any responsibility for it?

Albert Alioto, San Francisco

Oysters for the people

Drakes Bay belongs to the public? You mean Drakes Bay belongs to big government!

Just another move toward the Bolshevik takeover by The Man. It’s time to take it to the streets again like during the ’60’s and overthrow big government encroaching on our freedoms. Let people live!

T.C. Soderberg, San Francisco

<b>Charlie should not die

We in Australia have just found out about Charlie, the dog that may be ordered to die.

This is so wrong. He was in a dog park — why would a police officer ride a horse into a dog park?

Please, don’t let Charlie die.

Debra MacDonald, Adelaide, SA, Australia

True cost of clean power

When The City first talked about a lower-cost electric provider than the Hetch Hetchy municipal electrical system or PG&E, it looked interesting. But now, the new rates reflect the changes made when the Board of Supervisors approved the program.

The surcharges that customers will now pay will depend on how much energy they use.

Lower-cost green energy options would be wind, hydro and solar, in that order.

Thus the San Francisco Hetch Hetchy hydro  system would be the only cheap 100 percent green electric supply, but much of it is being sold off to Central Valley water districts.

Frank Norton, San Francisco

Bad decisions aid poverty

“Don’t push the poor and most vulnerable off the ‘fiscal cliff,’” was the mantra that senior religious officials from 16 states and the heads of some of the nation’s most prominent Christian, Jewish and Muslim organizations echoed on Capital Hill last week.

We reminded lawmakers that the deficit was caused as a result of inadequate revenue, an unnecessary level of military spending and a recession that has pushed even more people into poverty. We warned that significant cuts in any budget deal to vital humanitarian and poverty-focused assistance could result in increased poverty.  

In addition, we urged legislators not to make cuts to Medicare, Medicaid or Social Security that place an additional burden on vulnerable Americans or those living in poverty or that cause more people to fall into poverty.

Michael Pappas, M.Div., Executive Director, San Francisco Interfaith Council

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