Keep Transbay Terminal focused on transit

Bevan Dufty’s campaign stunt of insisting that the new Transbay Transit Center provide child-care facilities, at taxpayers’ expense, provides great insight into why our local, state and federal entities are in such dire financial straits — the belief of our social engineers that government must provide for its citizens from cradle to grave.

The land in question was donated to The City by the state to be sold and the profits used to fund the transit center. The cost of the types of facilities demanded by Dufty will decrease the funds available for the transit center — and where does it stop? How about a needle exchange, an undocumented-worker hiring center, a community garden or a homeless shelter?

If each of the candidates for mayor were to get his or her pet project on the property, there wouldn’t be any money left for the transit center.

John Brennan
Corte Madera

Welfare tax for family?

Reading the Dec. 13 editorial “Let a vigorous economy fight the war on poverty,” one wonders how a growing population — one fighting climate changes, with increasingly greater disasters, with such a large national debt — can at the same time grow the economy.

With over 10 percent of workers nationally out of work and a larger percentage on welfare, we appear to be going down a slippery slope. Perhaps, like Obamacare, a federal law can be constructed by the Legislature that would require families and relatives to be responsible for caring for those on welfare, or else pay a fine.

Just as unemployment insurance, Social Security and wages are taxed, so should welfare income and the negative federal income tax be eliminated to offset the payment of welfare that is not funded by relatives who may be exempted or nonexistent. Although this may not solve the welfare problem, it may solve the greater problem for all of defaulting on the debt payments.

Frank Norton
San Francisco

No way to run a city

It’s time to get serious about reducing the labor costs of city employees. Most of you opposed the recent proposition authored by Jeff Adachi (one of the few elected officials with the courage to take on the unions and other pickpocketers). I voted for it as a first step in the right direction.

So, what are your alternative proposals for reining in runaway pension and health care costs, not to mention excessive salaries and ridiculous amounts of overtime pay?

If we ran our business this way, we’d declare bankruptcy in about a week. The State of California is seemingly heading in that direction. What are you going to do to ensure that San Francisco does not continue to follow the Sacramento profligates down the yellow brick road to insolvency?

Larry S. Liederman
San Francisco

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