Illegal behavior on Muni has little to no oversight

I recently took the N-Judah train to work in the Inner Sunset at 8:40 a.m. in the morning. It was car number 1497A. A guy was sitting in the elderly/disabled seats loading his pipe with marijuana. It was very strong and he was sitting right near the train operator.

This is why people don’t want to ride the Muni in San Francisco. Who wants to ride transit to work every day with druggies, drunks, bums and thugs and absolutely no security?

Paula Zimmermann, San Francisco

Keep fighting the subway

Thank goodness for Quentin Kopp. When the Central Subway construction crews began tearing up downtown San Francisco, I became depressed and gave up. Fortunately, other opponents of this godforsaken project stayed the course. Thanks to the San Francisco Examiner for printing Kopp’s brilliant article on Monday.

Virginia Newhall, Greenbrae

Justin Herman nuisance

Now Justin Herman Plaza has been turned into an unsightly public nuisance, and tourists are less then excited by this new San Francisco landmark. And it is also true there is the issue of public health plus the close proximity of wharf rats.

What has me at a loss to understand is how do people — many of whom seem to be non-taxpaying teenage runaways — have the right to squat at prime public real estate, and what on earth does free speech have to do with camping?

Theodore Carl Soderberg, San Francisco

Is it socialism you want?

Recent polls indicating that most Americans believe wealth distribution is unfair are biased to the left. There is already too much distribution of wealth for welfare, entitlements and over-reaching government programs.

The Occupy Wall Street bunch thinks that they want socialism over capitalism. They don’t realize that socialism would include them in creating a giant underclass under the guns of authoritarian government.

Daniel B. Jeffs, Apple Valley

Terrifying debt numbers

On or about Halloween, the United States will reach a terrifying milestone — our total national debt will equal 100 percent of our national economy’s total annual gross domestic product. As financially prudent Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels observes, “that’s Greek territory, the point of no return where economies don’t recover.”

Meanwhile, President Barack Obama has abandoned even the pretext at attempting to govern in Washington. More than a year before the 2012 election, he is busy making political “swing state” visits at taxpayer expense to raise campaign cash and promote his own re-election.

Jim Hartman, Berkeley

2011letters to the editorOpinionSan Francisco

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

The City is seeking to enhance health care for San Francisco International Airport workers, which include more than 100 who have tested positive for COVID-19. <ins>(Courtesy photo)</ins>
Airlines, business groups fight new health insurance requirements for SFO workers

Heathy Airport Ordinance would require companies to offer family coverage or increase contributions

The Hall of Justice building at 850 Bryant St. is notorious for sewage leaks and is known to be seismically unsafe. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
SFPD speeding up Hall of Justice exit after another ‘large leak’

San Francisco police can’t get out of the decrepit Hall of Justice… Continue reading

The Telegraph Quartet is pictured during its SF Music Day 2020 recording session at the striking, beautifully lit and almost empty Herbst Theatre. (Courtesy Marcus Phillips)
SF Music Day goes virtual with Herbst broadcast

Performers pre-record sets in empty, iconic theater

Dr. Vincent Matthews, superintendent of the San Francisco Unified School District, said Tuesday that student would not be back in school before the end of this calendar year. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Superintendent: City schools will not reopen before the end of the year

San Francisco public schools won’t reopen to students for the rest of… Continue reading

The admissions process at the academically competitive Lowell High School is set to change this year due to coronavirus restritions. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Lowell’s selective admissions process put on hold this year — and more changes may be in the works

School board votes unanimously to use normal student assignment lottery for competitive school

Most Read