I pledge to promote global warming propaganda

Scientists see no temperature increase (on average) in the oceans or on the surface of the Earth during the past decade, but that hasn’t stopped an activist group from infiltrating high schools with the panicky message that we are on the verge of a “planetary emergency” due to global warming.

These alarmists are the recently formed Alliance for Climate Education, an Oakland-based nonprofit created by wealthy wind energy entrepreneur Michael Haas. The organization has targeted five cities, including the Bay Area. Haas, who donated $24,600 to President Barack Obama’s campaign and victory funds last year, stands to reap millions of dollars in government subsidies that climate change-driven energy policies would bring.

Meanwhile the teenagers targeted by ACE are treated to hip presentations with slick animation to propagate the idea that they — and everyone in their spheres of influence — must modify their behaviors so as to stop global warming. This is achieved by cutbacks in their energy use, which ACE believes produces too many greenhouse gases (through fossil fuel combustion from coal and oil) that warm the planet.

The mostly undiscerning kids love it. ACE, which lobbies school boards and administrators to get “invited” to give presentations, delivers their propaganda to hundreds of students at a time in assemblies. Getting out of class to watch an amusing talk highlighted by flatulent animated cows (to emphasize their methane emissions, another greenhouse gas) is good for plenty of laughs and scores points with teens.

But ACE’s talks are infected with fallacies, like telling students they’ve “lived through the 10 hottest years on record” (1934 was the hottest) and that greenhouse gas emissions are jacking up the global thermostat “way too high.” Talk about one-sided hyperbole to shape impressionable minds.

Meanwhile scientific studies like those that reveal we may be entering a prolonged cooling period, due to an inactive sun, are left out of climate discussion.

ACE has also targeted the Chicago, Los Angeles, Houston and Boston areas, and aims to reach 140,000 students by the end of the year. Their goal is simple: get students active in the name of dubious (at best) global warming alarmism, demonize fossil fuels and push solutions such as alternative energy.

Unfortunately, many teachers and administrators are too willing to let this biased bunch extract students from classes and force-feed them their pap. Parents should be aware that their kids might be the targets of this political recruitment effort during valuable class time.

Paul Chesser is a special correspondent for The Heartland Institute.

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