Hazardous trees could prove deadly — yet again

Hazardous trees could prove deadly — yet again

The negligence of Recreation and Park in not removing hazardous aging trees from city parks has already cost one life at Stern Grove. It’s only due to luck that no one else has been in the path of several other recent falling trees in public areas of Stern Grove, my neighborhood park.

Just three weeks before that unnecessary death in 2008, I saw a major tree crash happening just yards away from that same parking lot. It brought down other weakened trees and limb debris with it, completely blocking the 19th Avenue entry road where the Lowell High School cross country running team had been practicing only hours before.

Recently I was on the path where I usually take on my daily walk and was startled to find the passage blocked by a large fallen tree. Do I need to give up walking in my neighborhood park or pray before entering that my pup and I will make it out alive from Stern Grove?

San Francisco taxpayers passed two bonds for Rec and Park upgrades totaling some $385 million, so how can the department’s so-called lack of funds for cutting down known dangerous trees be justified?

Felicia Zeiger, San Francisco

Endorsement won’t go far

Former president Bill Clinton’s endorsement of Gavin Newsom probably won’t do much to boost our mayor’s sputtering campaign for governor of California, but it should firm up his appeal with the reprobate constituency.

Barry S. Eisenberg, San Francisco

Reform needs oversight

The Examiner likes to promote “tort reform,” but you never mention that it is the pet project of the insurance industry because a threat of litigation is the only real counterweight to their near-absolute power.

Insurance bosses are outraged that mere mortal lawyers might challenge their lucrative game. Bloated insurance bureaucracies, fat salaries and almighty earnings reports might be challenged — after the corporations paid so much for the best congressional and state representation that money can buy.

Insurers have grabbed virtually absolute power to bankrupt the medical profession. Their media campaigns to frighten doctors and the public have been as effective as they are lucrative.

There is room for reasonable protection of the medical profession from specious malpractice claims. Health care for all is possible, but only if it includes strong oversight of all of the culprits now profiting from our health scare crisis.

Mario M. Torrigino, San Francisco
 

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