Government tricks us into following the rules

As I was driving home from a Warriors game, the sign at the Oakland end of the Bay Bridge announced that there was an accident in the right lane and it was blocked. By the beginning of the cantilever structure, cones were squeezing the five lanes of traffic down to two lanes and reducing speed from 50 mph to 15 to 20 mph.

And then it turned out there was no accident, just the California Highway Patrol “calming” the traffic, because though they’ve posted speed-limit signs at the S-curve, they don’t actually trust us to obey them, so they have to control us from our own worst impulses. This is government lying to us for our own good.

Cary Fulbright, San Francisco

Cruise story not so bad

With all the headlines of daily misery in the world, somehow it is difficult to garner my sympathy for the passengers on the disabled cruise ship Splendor. Their lives were never in danger like the trapped Chilean miners, and they had comfortable beds to rest in. They just suffered some minor inconveniences of eating cold food (canned Spam), taking cold showers and boredom. But they will have their fares reimbursed.

There will be some lawsuits and people wanting to sell their sad stories. However, this disabled cruise ship may have been healthful for them, as it probably reduced their waistlines. Frankly, I like canned Spam and I am sure many other people do also.

Robert A. Jung, San Francisco

Sacred Heart has value

Sacred Heart, the 113-year-old brick church at the corner of Fell and Fillmore streets, is not “just an aging shell with some history,” as Ken Garcia soullessly implied in his Sunday column. This is a handsomely designed edifice whose rich history is intertwined with that of San Francisco and with the prominent neighborhood families that once worshipped there. As with other churches, an inventive reuse could be found for Sacred Heart. In the meantime, Megan Furth Catholic Academy, the new owners, should be persuaded to curtail their destructive dismantling.

Joseph B. Pecora, San Francisco

Voter verification lacking

I recently had the occasion to go to a physician’s office. I was required to show picture identification before I could see the physician, even though I had been seeing this physician for years and was known by my first name.
I was required to show my driver’s license before cashing a check at a bank where I have been doing business for a long time. I am asked for my driver’s license when I make major purchases by credit card, and I’ve seen young people carded at the supermarket for purchasing beer.

I have never been carded when I vote. Do you think there is something wrong with this picture?

Robert Parkhurst, Redwood City

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