Garcia will keep eye on spending

Supervisor Sean Elsbernd, who represents District 7, has been a stalwart fiscal moderate on a Board of Supervisors that frequently needs such guidance. With his term ending, City Hall needs a strong successor, and Mike Garcia is the candidate to fill those shoes.

District 7 stretches across several neighborhoods, from tony West of Twin Peaks enclaves to lower-income housing in Ingleside. The next supervisor needs to be able to listen to the constituents in that patchwork of neighborhoods while representing the entire city when appropriate.

Garcia has two politically viable opponents — FX Crowley and Norman Yee. Crowley is firmly aligned with labor interests and would be unbendable when it comes to tough issues such as pension and health care reform — both of which will likely be back on the board’s table within the term of the next supervisor. Yee was a good member and president of the school board, but his vague stances on critical issues in this race did not hold water next to Garcia, whose positions were clear and whose understanding of City Hall was unmatched.

The board needs at least one fiscal hawk to keep an eye on spending so it does not spiral out of control. Elsbernd filled that role admirably, and Garcia would be a worthy replacement.

editorialsNorman YeeOpinionSan Francisco Board of Supervisorssean elsbernd

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